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  1. #11
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    I follow the direction on the bottle of TF-4 fixer I use: 30 sec of agitation every min. 4 minutes total for typical B&W films, 6 minutes for tmax/delta types.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    I like to error on the higher side of agitation for fixing if there is no down side.
    There is absolutely no downside to it.

  3. #13

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    Dear Rattymouse,

    Agitate all you want. Short of buying a paint shaker (and I'd be more worried about physically destroying the film than anything else), you can't agitate too much when fixing. The Jobo system agitates each process continuously and it works great.

    Neal Wydra

  4. #14
    Bill Burk's Avatar
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    I once had an ancient darkroom instruction booklet which showed examples of processing faults... One was an image of "Over Fixation" which appeared about the same as an overexposed print.

    I always regarded that booklet with scorn, I always considered it to be misinformation. No other reference I could find described the same problem.

    Last time I looked for it, I couldn't find the booklet to point out its folly. I must have thrown it out.

  5. #15
    MattKing's Avatar
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    I turn my tank on its side and use continuous rotary agitation for each of the stop, fix and hypo clear parts of the process. Works for me.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #16
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    I use continuous rotary agitation for developing and fixing and it seems to work out just fine.
    Dan

    The simplest tools can be the hardest to master.

  7. #17
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    When fixing TMax film I noticed that I got uneven, and locally incomplete, fixing when processing 120 film in the 'usual' way (1st minute than 10 sec every 30 sec). SS Tanks and reels. Near-constant agitation with fixer solved the problem. I say semi-constant because my arms get tired when each hand is holding a double 120-reel tank! Of course, agitation method, type of tank and reel, temp. and all that sort of stuff are variables to take into consideration. When developing two tanks at once, I space the agitation of the developer so that I only need to agitate one tank at a time -- I can give it all my attention and it is easier on my arms.

    I use Jobo Expert Drums for 5x7 and 8x10 -- so constant agitation there. The 11x14 negs are one at a time in large trays, constant agitation throughout the process.
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  8. #18
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    I have found that both TMX100 and Efke 25 respond pretty well to constant agitation of fixer. Don't really know yet since I am just starting to use more AEU400, but I suspect I will find the same there as well.
    Dan

    The simplest tools can be the hardest to master.

  9. #19
    clayne's Avatar
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    As someone already know, T-grain films of course need twice the fixing as non T-grain to be on the safe side.
    Stop worrying about grain, resolution, sharpness, and everything else that doesn't have a damn thing to do with substance.

    http://www.flickr.com/kediwah

  10. #20
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by clayne View Post
    As someone already know, T-grain films of course need twice the fixing as non T-grain to be on the safe side.
    Actually I don't think I ever knew that... Hmm they would explain why the tmax is often pink but the rest of my films (non T grain) fix out fine... lol
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

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