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  1. #21

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    I would try a very warm developer. 35c and above. D76 1:3 or even Dektol.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    I would try a very warm developer. 35c and above. D76 1:3 or even Dektol.
    That would be I'll advised, B&W emulsions aren't designed to handle high temps like that, you'll end up stripping off the emulsion entirely...
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    That would be I'll advised, B&W emulsions aren't designed to handle high temps like that, you'll end up stripping off the emulsion entirely...
    Try it instead of spreading false info. It won't strip the emulsion at all.

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    Try it instead of spreading false info. It won't strip the emulsion at all.
    Yes, I have process the original T-Max 100 at over 100 F and the benefits were excellent grain, faster developing times, better contrast control and no pink color cast to the base. I think I got it from an old "Darkroom Techniques" magazine article, but can't remember for sure. One thing I do know for sure is that the emulsion did not slide off the base and showed no ill effects at all. I believe I was using Kodak HC110 at the time, but it could have been Edwals FG7 too???

  5. #25

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    Developing in extra warm developer is an old, known trick. I think it might give Umut what he is trying to achieve.

    stoneNYC has this habit of trying to sound like an expert but just shows he has no experience.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    Developing in extra warm developer is an old, known trick. I think it might give Umut what he is trying to achieve.

    stoneNYC has this habit of trying to sound like an expert but just shows he has no experience.
    You might be right on, for BIG, well defined grain with a faster film, but from my experience with T-Max 100 I didn't notice an increase in grain size as the temp increased. But that was T-Max and not something like Tri-X or Foma 400, which I never tried at higher than recommended temps. I can only report what I know and have experienced. JohnW

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    Developing in extra warm developer is an old, known trick. I think it might give Umut what he is trying to achieve.

    stoneNYC has this habit of trying to sound like an expert but just shows he has no experience.
    You have a habit of being mean to people in order to sound superior.

    Heating B&W emulsion WILL cause it to become highly susceptible to damage, just like older C-22 that wasn't designed for high heat C-41 processing which is something that was said on a thread about not doing C-22 in C-41 without lowering the temp, this I believe was what PE said but that I could be incorrect about but it was someone who was highly knowledgeable.

    I have not done this, it's true, have you?

    Why can't you be nice about things and say "stone, it probably will soften the emulsion some, but I think you can still do it as long as you're careful with the emulsion" or something nice instead of saying it in a derogatory manner, there's a lot of stuff I have done like successfully shooting and developing film as old as 66 years expired. I'm a little more capable than you give me credit for.

    How old are you anyway?
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  8. #28

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    warm dektol for 1/2 the time agitate normally
    warm caffenol c for the second half of the time .. agitate continuously

    works like a charm

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    You have a habit of being mean to people in order to sound superior.

    Heating B&W emulsion WILL cause it to become highly susceptible to damage, just like older C-22 that wasn't designed for high heat C-41 processing which is something that was said on a thread about not doing C-22 in C-41 without lowering the temp, this I believe was what PE said but that I could be incorrect about but it was someone who was highly knowledgeable.

    I have not done this, it's true, have you?

    Why can't you be nice about things and say "stone, it probably will soften the emulsion some, but I think you can still do it as long as you're careful with the emulsion" or something nice instead of saying it in a derogatory manner, there's a lot of stuff I have done like successfully shooting and developing film as old as 66 years expired. I'm a little more capable than you give me credit for.

    How old are you anyway?
    Hmmm, I think you ought to try some T-Max 100 or even TMY-2 at some higher temps (100 f) and see what we're talking about. I never try to cast wisdom where experience has never been. I might say something like this, "I've heard tell a developer does this..........."' when I have never tried it myself. When I try something I can then speak from experience. Many things I doubt sometimes become truth whether I believe it our not. That's my choice, to believe it or not. JohnW

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mustafa Umut Sarac View Post
    Hello Michael,

    I want grit and acutance together.
    Grain (grit) and acutance are a contradiction in terms. What about trying to achieve a fine grain high acutance image and then use a grain screen when you print it.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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