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Thread: film fog

  1. #1

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    film fog

    How much does the reflection from the darkroom clock fog the film?

  2. #2

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    I've never found it to be a problem, but haven't tested either.
    In general if the film is no closer than 3 or 4 feet, it shouldn't be a problem.

  3. #3
    argyrotype's Avatar
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    1.put a sheet of 4x5 film on your counter near the enlarger, emulsion side up..

    2. place a quarter on the film.

    3. after 5 minutes, develop the film and look for the circle.

    4. If you only see clear film, stop worrying.

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    how bright is the clock? -- is this a radium dial clock or a led clock? -- My Gra-Lab timer has Very bright radium (glow in the dark) numbers and dials but is MADE for the darkroom. I also have multiple led numbers on my enlarger timer---looking around there are a lot of things that glow or light up in the darkroom but all were expressly made for the function.
    * Just because your eyes are closed, doesn't mean the lights in the darkroom are off. *
    * When the film you put in the camera is worth more than the camera you put the film in... *
    * When I started using 8x10, it amazed me how many shots were close to the car. *

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    The human eye is far more sensitive to light than any conventional film. What appears to be bright to us is not seen by the film. When in doubt do a test.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 01-28-2014 at 10:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #6
    fotch's Avatar
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    I don't know how much however, if it seems to bright, cover it and thus eliminate it and you don't have to wonder. JMHO
    Items for sale or trade at www.Camera35.com

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    Your enlarger is probably leaking 3 times as much light as the clock. I wouldn't worry about it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    Your enlarger is probably leaking 3 times as much light as the clock. I wouldn't worry about it.
    You probably don't want to have your enlarger turned on when you have undeveloped film out in your darkroom .

    I have friends that have towels attached to the top of their Gralab timers that they flip down in front of the timers when photo-sensitive materials are out.

    Personally, I think that is most likely unnecessary. I would just position the timers so they are facing away from the materials.

    As far as LEDs on equipment, I would suggest turning off or screening what you can, and testing with respect to the rest.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  9. #9
    MDR
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    Depends on the film doesn't it Delta 3200 pushed to 12500 might get a little fogged. If you get closer like 5 cm or so you might get some fog on ISO 100 and higher films.

  10. #10
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    The human eye is far more sensitive to light than any conventional film. What appears to be bright to us is not seen by the film. When in doubt do a test.
    On an APUG trip to Cornwall (about 4 years ago) I stayed in a B&B and changed sheet films (LF) in a bedroom with poor curtains and sodium street lighting. At first I thought it was dark but as my eyes adjusted i could see what I was doing !!! No problems which was rather surprising.

    Ian

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