Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 76,303   Posts: 1,681,538   Online: 726
      
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 29 of 29
  1. #21
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    A presoak, fesh fixer, longer fixing time and a longer wash should give you clear negatives.

  2. #22
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,813
    Images
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    +1
    +2

    You can also run replenished fixer regime, which basically keep the fixer at the same activity forever.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #23
    effae's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    17
    What do you guys consider a longer wash to be? I've gone by the instructions, and thus wash my kodak films for 30min and ilfords for 10mins. I rinse both in distilled water for an additional 5min to avoid stains. My tri-x films are still rather purple, but I recon they're within normal limits.

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    83
    Washing out the purple stain depends on pH, where a high pH (alkaline/neutral) is better than a low (acidic). Your fixer (a neutral type) obviously became more acidic over time, probably by carryover from the stop.

    G.

  5. #25
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    Quote Originally Posted by effae View Post
    What do you guys consider a longer wash to be? I've gone by the instructions, and thus wash my kodak films for 30min and ilfords for 10mins. I rinse both in distilled water for an additional 5min to avoid stains. My tri-x films are still rather purple, but I recon they're within normal limits.
    It depends on the film. TMAX and Tri-X can be very purple.

    With those films I presoak for 5 minutes, fix for 8-10 minutes (depending on freshness) wash for 10 minutes and soak for 15-20 minutes.

    That gives me completely clear negatives.

    There is still a hint of purple before the final soak, but it's gone after 15-20 minutes.

    Probably these times could vary depending on water and chems as suggested by previous poster.

  6. #26
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,813
    Images
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    It depends on the film. TMAX and Tri-X can be very purple.

    With those films I presoak for 5 minutes, fix for 8-10 minutes (depending on freshness) wash for 10 minutes and soak for 15-20 minutes.

    That gives me completely clear negatives.

    There is still a hint of purple before the final soak, but it's gone after 15-20 minutes.

    Probably these times could vary depending on water and chems as suggested by previous poster.
    For me, I don't pre-soak, used TMax 400 and Tri-X 400 in either Xtol or D76, and with a 6 minute cycle in fresh fixer get completely clear negatives after a 20 minute wash.
    With partially spent fixer I get slightly pink/purple Tri-X but the TMax stays clear. Presoak makes no difference for me. Fresh fixer does.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #27
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    That sounds familiar. I reuse 1 litre of diluted TMAX fix for five times and after the third time the negs come out a little purple but that goes away in the final soak.

    But the presoak water comes out purple bordering on black, so I guess it must have some effect, either on the film or the chems?

  8. #28
    Arcturus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    83
    Is it really that important to get all the purple out? I just thought some films were a little purple, like tri-x, others like Acros 100 are crystal clear. I used to drive myself crazy trying to get the purple out but then I figured it didn't make any difference when printing so I stopped worrying about the purple. I just follow Ilfords recommendations for fixing and washing so all of this seems like overkill to me, but I'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination. Also, the water bill can add up fast!

  9. #29
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,813
    Images
    300
    Quote Originally Posted by Arcturus View Post
    Is it really that important to get all the purple out? I just thought some films were a little purple, like tri-x, others like Acros 100 are crystal clear. I used to drive myself crazy trying to get the purple out but then I figured it didn't make any difference when printing so I stopped worrying about the purple. I just follow Ilfords recommendations for fixing and washing so all of this seems like overkill to me, but I'm not an expert by any stretch of the imagination. Also, the water bill can add up fast!
    A little of that purple makes no difference in printing, if that's what you ask. And no, it's not important to remove it. Some people still get their underwear in a bunch because of that tint anyway... There are five million threads about it here on APUG already.
    If you fix your negatives according to the manufacturers' instructions, using fresh fixer, and then wash properly, you have archival negatives (just store them well). The end.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin