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Thread: Hypo-clear

  1. #1

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    Hypo-clear

    Quick question regarding hypo-clear. I'm doing some at home film development, and want to try using hypo-clear to reduce wash times.

    After developing, stopping, and fixing - I then wash, followed by 1 minute of hypo-clear? How long is it recommended that I wash after using hypo-clear.

    Typically I develop, stop, fix, rinse with city water, and then rinse twice with distilled water in developing tank. If I don't rinse with distilled water after the initial rinse, Chicago water leaves some nasty residue on the film.

    Thanks,

    Mark

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    There isn't much benefit using hypo-clear for film, as the fixer doesn't soak in to the filmbase (having said that I did once see paper 'film', but it was from the 1960's and found at the back of a drawer belonging to someones deceased relative).

    Simply follow the instructions of the film/chemical manufacturer. If using a rapid-fix then read up on the "Ilford" wash method - that is still a lot more washing than you are currently using, but not very much more water . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    Hypo clear is for paper.

    You are not washing the film enough. After washing the film should be rinsed with Kodak PhotoFlo or other equivalent. Do not even think about using liquid soap or anything else in place of Kodak PhotoFlo or other equivalent.
    What I understand, according to Kodak's recommendations, is that hypo-clear reduces washing times per the chart they provide. 5 minutes vs 20-30 without. I hate the idea of leaving the water running for 30 minutes. I shut it off when I brush my teeth!

    I just wanted some clarification to make sure I'm doing things correctly. We have a film dryer in the darkroom, so I've never used photo-flo, but I suppose I should at home.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    There isn't much benefit using hypo-clear for film, as the fixer doesn't soak in to the filmbase (having said that I did once see paper 'film', but it was from the 1960's and found at the back of a drawer belonging to someones deceased relative).

    Simply follow the instructions of the film/chemical manufacturer. If using a rapid-fix then read up on the "Ilford" wash method - that is still a lot more washing than you are currently using, but not very much more water . . .
    See page 2 of this chart. I know it's not a requirement to use, but it cuts down on wash times correct? How does rapid fixer vs regular affect wash times?
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/aj3/aj3.pdf

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    Quote Originally Posted by mporter012 View Post
    See page 2 of this chart. I know it's not a requirement to use, but it cuts down on wash times correct? How does rapid fixer vs regular affect wash times?
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...bs/aj3/aj3.pdf
    No difference in wash times for rapid or regular fixer.
    As noted, hypo-clear does cut down the wash time for film or paper. As I recall, without hypo-clear, Kodak's recommendation for film washing is 20 minutes in running water.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mporter012 View Post
    I hate the idea of leaving the water running for 30 minutes. I shut it off when I brush my teeth!
    Why? Water prices in Chicago are dirt cheap. Any water down the drain is either reclaimed by the city and "sold" again after treatment or reclaimed by nature and "sold" again in future.

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    wash time is temperature dependent...
    15 minutes of running water is expensive above15C
    Ilfords three changes after clear is archival
    California and China have water problems already
    Last edited by Xmas; 03-03-2014 at 12:12 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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    People seem to think that when water goes down the drain, it's gone. No. In most cities it goes into the sewer collection pipes, then to the water treatment facility to be treated before its sent back into local streams and rivers, then back into the ocean. Remember, matter cannot be created nor destroyed. Nothing comes, nor goes, from nothing. All the atoms that exist in the universe were there upon it's creation. Matter is simply transformed into other forms of energy. Even in our vast oceans (which are rapidly being dangerously polluted by the insane radioactive leaking from Japan, where there is a world wide news coverup), the water evaporates into the earth's atmosphere, collects into storm clouds, and comes back down to earth as rain. This is what should scare people. Radioactive nuclear heavy water being allowed to flow freely into our oceans, not a little photographic film water going into the drain.

    While it's true that some areas of earth experience temporary water shortages due to poorly planned infrastructure (resulting in overly concentrated human populations), and poor use of existing water resources, other places have too much water and often suffer flooding. Science is an amazing thing. There are more possible brain cell synapse connections in one human brain than there are atoms in the entire known universe. Use them.

    Hypo is for paper, not film.
    Last edited by momus; 03-03-2014 at 12:55 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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    Stick with a rapid fixer and don't use hypo-clear for film...and if you print with resin coated paper, don't use it for paper either. Also, no need to use distilled water when washing. I used Chicago tap water in the lab at Loyola, and I use Chicago tap water in my apartment. The key is to use PhotoFlo...or if you need to in a pinch, Jet Dry. Fill the film tank up, put in a drop or two, and swirl the reels. It's as easy as that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    While it's true that some areas of earth experience temporary water shortages due to poorly planned infrastructure (resulting in overly concentrated human populations), and poor use of existing water resources, other places have too much water and often suffer flooding. Science is an amazing thing.
    confirm temporary if you mean a century or longer
    suggest google 'global warming'...

    everyone knows about reactor accidents and thermo nuclear atmospheric tests but unless it rains in SCalf soon the toilets won't flush and they will only have bottled water to wash with...

    water is too expensive to move, building on flood plains is/was silly, sea levels can change

    the 20th Century was exceptionally wet in some areas

    be happy

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