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  1. #11

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    Oh, I forgot, get a wetting agent for drying. A few drops of liquid soap or something like that might do, do some Google searches. It prevents spotting while drying, very useful.

  2. #12
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hgraf View Post
    Oh, I forgot, get a wetting agent for drying. A few drops of liquid soap or something like that might do, do some Google searches. It prevents spotting while drying, very useful.
    Careful with that one. Some of those liquid soaps contain things you don't want on your film for long term storage. Purpose made wetting agent, such as Ilfotol, Edwal LFN, Sprint End Run, and Kodak Photoflo are very inexpensive and a bottle lasts virtually forever.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Careful with that one. Some of those liquid soaps contain things you don't want on your film for long term storage. Purpose made wetting agent, such as Ilfotol, Edwal LFN, Sprint End Run, and Kodak Photoflo are very inexpensive and a bottle lasts virtually forever.
    Ditto to this and do not use too much. A few drops of straight Photoflo are sufficient. If you see foaming, you used too much.


    While D76 is a very good standard developer, it is a powder. For a beginner, I do think it's easier to start with a liquid. They're easier to mix and handle. If you're in the US, consider Sprint chemicals - they're very general and easy to use and fairly economical. Once you get the procedure down and have an idea what you like or don't like in your images, then there are many other films and chemicals to think about. TriX or HP5+ with Sprint, D76, or Ifosol S are all good choices.Brand doesn't really matter and you don't have to use the same brand for developer, stop, and fixer either.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Careful with that one. Some of those liquid soaps contain things you don't want on your film for long term storage. Purpose made wetting agent, such as Ilfotol, Edwal LFN, Sprint End Run, and Kodak Photoflo are very inexpensive and a bottle lasts virtually forever.
    I agree that you take a little risk there, that's why I recommended the OP use google to find a good choice.

    The issue with purpose made wetting agents is locally, at least for me, they are very hard to find. I personally use Ilfotol, but I got lucky that one of the local camera shops in my area had one tucked away on a dusty shelf.

    Obviously this sort of stuff is available online, if that's an option (sometimes it isn't, some countries have trouble with these sorts of chemicals being shipped to them).

    TTYL

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mfohl View Post
    For times, temperatures, dilutions, consult the Massive Dev Chart, http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.php. The values there are at least close to manufacturers' recommendations, and they are a good starting point.

    An earlier poster suggested using one film with one developer for a while and figure out if you're happy with it. That's good advice. Variations can be found on the Massive Dev Chart.
    If you have a smart phone or tablet, there is a massive dev app that is absolutely wonderful. It allows you to record your own workflow, adjust for different temp and ISO and dilution, and take notes. It also has a timer that takes you through the whole process. I've found it has almost all the info I need.

  6. #16
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    I won't repeat all the good advice above, but when it comes to the last question, volume of developer, I have two suggestions.

    Either use a liquid concentrate which you can mix up as you go along.

    Or make a 5 litre batch from powder and divide it into smaller bottles with no air in them. That way you should have a good stock solution for up to six months. (5 litres is the equivalent of 20 rolls of medium format or 30 rolls of 35 mm, using 1:1 solution. Roughly that's one film per week for six months.)

    If you don't use up 5 litres of developer in less than six months, then the obvious solution is to shoot more film!

  7. #17
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    And I echo the users above who referenced ilford's site. I used their 'how to' for my first foray into the darkroom. Honestly? The hardest part for me was reeling. I would suggest a lot of practice with a junk roll. As for chemicals, my first time, I used DDX, ilford stop, and ilford rapid fixer, and I think my first roll was delta 100. Or possibly tmax.

  8. #18
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    One more thing, on film.

    It may be easier to avoid t-grain films like Delta or TMAX in the beginning. These films are far less forgiving of slip-ups in exposure or development than the classic films.

    A good start might be Tri-X, HP5 or FP4.

    That way you'll almost certainly get a usable negative each time.

  9. #19
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    Kodak has made a PDF available that explains everything. You can find it by following this link.

    or google for kodak tech pub AJ3
    Last edited by BradS; 03-06-2014 at 12:16 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by rubyfalls View Post
    Honestly? The hardest part for me was reeling. I would suggest a lot of practice with a junk roll.
    Which reel do you use?

    I was prepared to have lots of trouble reeling, but the Paterson plastic reels are so easy, my first practice attempt was perfect. I haven't had a SINGLE reel that didn't turn out perfectly.

    Even in 120, while it took me a little longer the first time, it went on the reel without issue. 36 exposure films go on just as easy as 24. It is an amazing system.

    TTYL

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