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  1. #101
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    I'm not sure what this thread is about at the moment.

    But if the question is whether there are visible differences between negatives of various films, then I would have to say yes of course!

    How big or important these differences are depend on your personal view. Something that looks almost the same to one person may appear radically different to another. It depends on what details you pay attention to, if any.

    If anything these differences will be more apparent in a sccan than a print. In the print you have an overlay of other factors, which affect the look.

    Personally, I have no trouble telling my films apart based on scans with no identifying marks.

  2. #102
    Aristotle80's Avatar
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    I have two thoughts about T-grain films I can put in nutshells.

    After 10 pages of this thread I'm stunned that nobody has brought up the way that tabular grain films exhaust fixer at the speed of light. When I first tried TMAX films 15 years ago I could fix TWICE the number of Plus-X rolls in the same volume of freshly made fixer. TMAX and Delta films are wonderful, but in my experience they require much fresher fixer to clear completely. When I track the number of times the fixer has been used, my own system counts a single roll of Delta 400 as TWO rolls of FP4+. Once I made that adjustment I never had to suddenly mix fresh fix and re-fix on the fly. This fact alone tells me that something is really different with the substance of the emulsion itself, regardless of the results when printing.

    The second thing I consider about tabular grain films is that Delta 100 has such fine grain, I can't always focus on it properly with my enlarger in 6x6 format! I can focus on Delta 100 grain in 35mm format under the enlarger because the enlargement factor is so big. I consciously choose grainier film for medium format because of my difficulties enlarging sharply. That's a failure of my own eyes, but something for people to think about. The result looks just as smooth because it's not enlarged as much. My concession to age.
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  3. #103
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Why all the dislike for tabular-type films?

    You can always get a more powerful grain magnifier or use one of the type with a plastic "ground glass" type screen to focus on the image itself.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Roger Cole; 03-09-2014 at 07:11 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #104
    RattyMouse's Avatar
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    Does Neopan Acros kill fixer extra fast too?

  5. #105
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    I have not noticed Acros being any harder to fix than "normal" films.
    f/22 and be there.

  6. #106

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    Cheesus... This is still going???

    Just load it up n try it for yourself! Liking anything is a personal choice!
    Anyone can make a Digital print, but only a photographer can make a photograph.

  7. #107
    piu58's Avatar
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    > that tabular grain films exhaust fixer at the speed of light

    That may be a misinterpretation. Tabular films contain much more iodide (indtead of bromide) which fixes harder. It is not uncommon to fix the film for 10 minutes. If you count the "freshness" of the fixer measuring the fixation time you may come to the conclusion of exhausted fixer. But it isn't. Tabular films simply need a longer time.
    ---
    Uwe Pilz

  8. #108
    fhovie's Avatar
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    One of the things that draws me away from Tab films and keeps me with TRI-X and FP4 is that I can get a "sharper" image with the non-tab films. Now hear me out ... with certain low sulfite developers such as pyro or ascorbic acid types, there is a certain erosion of grain that causes a ridge to form in the terminator between light and dark areas of the negative. This line adds to the apparent sharpness of the image. Super fine grain films will not have the grain structure to allow this formation and although they have better resolution, they will not appear as sharp. For most of my work I like the apparent sharpness I can achieve with non tab films. I still use and enjoy tab films at times and do appreciate some of the things they can do with smooth tonality and grainless prints but for most of my work, a little grain is fine and a lot of sharpness is better. I shoot 6x6 through 8x10 ... For 35mm or smaller, I think I would prefer tab films. (But I almost never shoot smaller than 6x6)
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  9. #109

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    Quote Originally Posted by piu58 View Post
    > that tabular grain films exhaust fixer at the speed of light

    That may be a misinterpretation. Tabular films contain much more iodide (indtead of bromide) which fixes harder. It is not uncommon to fix the film for 10 minutes. If you count the "freshness" of the fixer measuring the fixation time you may come to the conclusion of exhausted fixer. But it isn't. Tabular films simply need a longer time.
    Yes but that is not apparent if you fix by time and temperature and only discover you have unfixed negs when you look at the film while drying or later.

    If you fix by inspection and use two baths it is easier to ensure archival fixing.

    Because I use plain hypo I normally need to fix the tabulars for more than ten minutes at 20C and in a multi tank it is easy to see which films are tabs.

    You can stand tabs and non tabs 1:100 in Rodinal...

  10. #110

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    The t-grain films develop very well in Rodinal diluted to 1:2 million and stand developed for 40 years.



 

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