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  1. #11

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    A few months ago I had to do a multiple copies of I guess 10 negatives. I grabbed my biggest two tanks that hold up to 16x20 each. They also take 4 8x10s at a time. I'd expose eight sheets so I could fill the two tanks. Then I'd move over and process. When it went well it went very well. When I screwed up I had up to four screw ups in a tank. Still was able to push out more prints then any other method I could think of. This was with colour paper but RC paper shouldn't be much different in the tanks. I know some have problems with fibre paper in the tanks.

    It really felt like work and if I had any need to this more often then I'd get a processor and just feed the thing with exposed paper.

  2. #12
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    The only machine that I've used for B&W is the Kodak Royalprint. As I remember, it only took RC and was a major maintenance PITA.

    Of course if one turns up on that Kiwi auction site, Sean will probably buy it
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  3. #13
    John_Brewer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    does anyone use these nova processors for B&W?



    I am just wondering what the drawbacks are.. does it scratch the paper, how does it agitate in the dev stage? are they a pain to maintain and clean, etc? thanks!
    I use one of those, a 12x16 quad. You can print very quickly by increasing the temperature. You get no scratches, it has a small footprint and chemistry lasts ages. Easy enough to clean too. The only small drawback is two very tiny pin pricks where the paper holder grabs the paper. Agitation is done by lifting the paper in and out or wiggling it side by side.
    ~John~
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    www.johnbrewerphotography.com
    There are 10 types of people in this world - those who understand binary and those who don't.

  4. #14
    James Bleifus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley
    I don't like trying to develop multiple sheets in a tray so here's what I do. Once I am certain I have the exposure and developing nailed, I expose enough sheets for the total I want. Each exposed sheet is tucked into a box. Then, after all the sheets are exposed, I develop them one at a time.
    That's the way I do it. More than one sheet in the developer at a time is more than I can handle - especially if I'm using a water bath. Then I park the prints in the stop bath until they're all developed and move them collectively into the fix.

    Cheers,

    James

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Hawley
    I don't like trying to develop multiple sheets in a tray so here's what I do. Once I am certain I have the exposure and developing nailed, I expose enough sheets for the total I want. Each exposed sheet is tucked into a box. Then, after all the sheets are exposed, I develop them one at a time.
    I have to say I now use this method also. But I'm not making prints in a production line anymore.

    In an earlier job, when I was working in the darkroom of a computer company, we had to make multiple prints of equipment. I would expose all the sheets of paper then start emersing them into the chemicals. Paper was fanned out on the right, so I could quickly grabb the next sheet. Rght hand stayed dry, picking up a sheet and placing it in the tray. Left hand then submerged the print until the pile was in. Then the bottom print was pulled to the top, rotating the pile through all the chemicals. This was done with RC paper and we were not making fine prints. Just prints to stuff into a media kit.
    George Losse
    www.georgelosse.com

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by John_Brewer
    I use one of those, a 12x16 quad. You can print very quickly by increasing the temperature. You get no scratches, it has a small footprint and chemistry lasts ages. Easy enough to clean too. The only small drawback is two very tiny pin pricks where the paper holder grabs the paper. Agitation is done by lifting the paper in and out or wiggling it side by side.
    I also use a Nova FB four slot tank and agitate by moving the paper in a circular motion in the slot.
    I replentish the chemicals at the rate of 100cc for every 10 off 10 x 8 prints or equivalent, this way my tank lasts about 2 months before it needs refilling.

    IMHO there are no real drawbacks only benefits.

  7. #17

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    I've also got a 20x24 easel that is designed for making multiple prints on one sheet of paper. 4 8x10s or a bunch of smaller ones. I've never really used it in that mode but it would let a person print a whole set of prints,develop the one sheet then later cut it up.

  8. #18
    Maine-iac's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sean
    Hi,

    I have a huge bottleneck in my darkroom workflow when it comes to making multiple copies of 1 print. I usually just do 5-10 copies of a print if I really like it. This is a huge time hit doing the copies and I'm wondering how others manage it. I suppose larger trays with multiple prints at a time, but I hate to use so much chem and my sink is not very big. Maybe someone is doing something I have not thought of yet.. Thanks
    This is an area where the technique of divided development really shines. One of the problems of processing multiple prints of the same negative in a single-solution developer is that it's difficult to get them all looking exactly alike, since the developer is becoming increasingly exhausted with each print.

    By separating the developing agents from the activating agent (see my article in the "Chemistry Recipe" section) it is possible to get absolutely consistent repeatability from print to print.

    Larry

  9. #19

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    I do like others here; print all the prints, lay out, and develop each one alone, and let sit in stop bath until they're done. Batch fixing comes next.

    The problem I've had in the past (and scratched my head about many times) is that when I did 3 prints at a time in the developer, I'd always get inconsistent results. One print was usually right on, one lighter one darker. Very frustrating. I tried tests with two prints, exposed exactly the same, side by side in a try, being agitated exactly alike (both face down, neither one overlapping the other, paralell) rocking the tray (not touching the prints) and they still had a noticable difference in density. Now it's back to one at a time, and all is well.

  10. #20
    BarrieB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    I've also got a 20x24 easel that is designed for making multiple prints on one sheet of paper. 4 8x10s or a bunch of smaller ones. I've never really used it in that mode but it would let a person print a whole set of prints,develop the one sheet then later cut it up.
    I often make multiple copies of 5" x 7" prints by printing two-up on 8" x 10" paper ( I have a special pvc mask ) , this cuts down on the number of pieces of paper floating around in the wash etc, it is easy to trim them all up after they dry.
    I also employ this method when making 'multiple Post Cards / Xmas Cards too. cheers Barrie.

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