Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,766   Posts: 1,516,419   Online: 981
      
Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 35
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    471

    Help With Chemistry!!!!

    I am in final stages of completing my own darkroom. This space will be used by two photographers ALOT as well as the occasional friend. I have been using school facilities for some time... I am adept at mixing school chemicals (D76 and other basics) as well as using some Tmax dev. for Tmax film.... Thats about it.

    I own the "Darkroom Cookbook" and this place seems to be a great resource but chemcals are just a little intimidating to me. I'm torn between keeping things simple and experimenting with all kinds of stuff. I'd like to mix my own stuff as opposed to buying mixes.

    Is there a good developer that can be standardized easily and maybe tweaked here and there, to do other things? What are good, easy Stops and Fixes?

    Anyone have any advice on the matter?

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    D-23 is pretty simple. Not the cheapest developer to make but the difference is likely pennies per roll. You can tweak it with dilution.

    TF-2 is a pretty simple fixer.

    Stop? Water and vinegar. Pretty simple.

    If you decide to mix your own you can just lay in a few common chemicals and then mix up most things.

    Metol
    Hydroquine
    Sodium sulfite
    plus a few others and you'll be able to mix most developers.

    If you really wanted you could try a different developer with each roll. I wouldn't reccomend it but the only thing stopping you is your willingness to experiment.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Chattanooga, Tennessee
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by Bighead
    I am in final stages of completing my own darkroom. This space will be used by two photographers ALOT as well as the occasional friend. I have been using school facilities for some time... I am adept at mixing school chemicals (D76 and other basics) as well as using some Tmax dev. for Tmax film.... Thats about it.

    I own the "Darkroom Cookbook" and this place seems to be a great resource but chemcals are just a little intimidating to me. I'm torn between keeping things simple and experimenting with all kinds of stuff. I'd like to mix my own stuff as opposed to buying mixes.

    Is there a good developer that can be standardized easily and maybe tweaked here and there, to do other things? What are good, easy Stops and Fixes?

    Anyone have any advice on the matter?
    At the risk of being no help to you, I'll throw in my 2 cents.

    You'll find that the type of film you use may yield radically different results in various developers. If I had to recommend one developer, that's fairly 'tweakable', it would be HC-110. Experimenting with various dilutions and agitation methods will provide you a variety of results for any film. Many would probably say the same of Rodinal though I limit my Rodinal use to slow films in an attempt to minimize perceived grain.

    The easiest stop for me is distilled water. Many will tell you it can yield uneven results, but I've never had uneven results due to the stop bath.

    I switched to TF-4 archival fixer about 6 months ago and I will NEVER use any other fixer. It's fast, consistent, and MUCH easier to get rid of while washing. Furthermore, if you ever get into using any of the Pyro developers, TF-4 is the fixer you will see highly recommended for them.

    I hope I helped somewhat.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    471
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    If you really wanted you could try a different developer with each roll. I wouldn't reccomend it but the only thing stopping you is your willingness to experiment.
    I'd like to experiment but I think I'm still wet enough behind the ears that I may not notice the differences... I think I want to keep a standard going for the most part... Try new things when I've run out of ideas on what to work on... You know?? I'm kind of a control freak and I think I value consistancy more than anything. I know, not great words coming from an "artist"...

    Quote Originally Posted by apratsunrthd
    You'll find that the type of film you use may yield radically different results in various developers.
    I'm steering away from Tmax films and am using mostly Ilford. I may use something slow one day and Delta 3200 the next...
    Thanks guys....

  5. #5
    John Bartley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    13 Critchley Avenue, PO Box 36, Monteith Ont, P0K1P0
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,397
    Quote Originally Posted by Bighead
    ...snipped...

    I own the "Darkroom Cookbook" and this place seems to be a great resource but chemcals are just a little intimidating to me. I'm torn between keeping things simple and experimenting with all kinds of stuff. I'd like to mix my own stuff as opposed to buying mixes.

    Is there a good developer that can be standardized easily and maybe tweaked here and there, to do other things? What are good, easy Stops and Fixes?

    Anyone have any advice on the matter?
    This would be an opinion, NOT advice. I have only been at this for about 8 months, so very much the beginner. I like things simple, so I bought the raw chemicals and mix my own D23. I use it divided and develop both film and paper in it. It's simple, easy to mix, easy to use and cheap enough. My next self mixes are going to be stop and fix so that I can reduce darkroom odour.

    cheers

  6. #6
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    To begin with, buy the chemicals for D-23. Add borax and sodium carbonate to your shopping list - and a little potassium bromide is handy too.

    You will then have enough chemicals to use D-23 for fine grain, two versions of "divided" D-23 with different contrast and grain size, as well as "Beutler's" for maximum sharpness (and grain) with slow films.

    If I use stop bath at all I use citric acid in water.

    For fixer I will [blatant plug]recommend my own construct: OF-1. Find it in the Chemical Recipes section. [/blatant plug]
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    105
    I have been mixing my own D-76 for several years now as per the formulas in the Darkroom Cookbook. I use the buffered version, with boric acid and additional borax and use the "spoon" equivalents for easier mixing, buying all ingredients from Photographers Formulary. It takes only slightly longer than mixing from store bought powder but I find that I know the age of the ingredients whereas when I bought locally, I purchased old (brown) developer on several occations. I guess if I was more consistant in my photographic habits I would be able to buy the correct amounts of developer, but I photograph in fits and starts and so need fresh developer at 10PM on a Sunday night, 3 or 4 months after my last purchase.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    471
    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    You will then have enough chemicals to use D-23 for fine grain, two versions of "divided" D-23 with different contrast and grain size, as well as "Beutler's" for maximum sharpness (and grain) with slow films.
    Thats one I was looking for... A standard recipe with a good "tweak" factor.... I will give that a shot, at first.... Everyone, thank you for your advice thus far... Please keep the comments coming.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Willamette Valley, Oregon
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,684
    Quote Originally Posted by John Bartley
    ... I like things simple, so I bought the raw
    chemicals and mix my own D23. I use it divided
    and develop both film and paper in it. ...
    D23, 7.5 grams metol and 100 grams sodium sulfite,
    is a complete film developer in itself. You then use
    a bath 2 for further development; some alkali?

    Do you use two bath for both film and paper?
    Is that second bath the same for the two?

    I compound all chemistry used and use
    all one-shot. Dan

  10. #10
    John Bartley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    13 Critchley Avenue, PO Box 36, Monteith Ont, P0K1P0
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    1,397
    Quote Originally Posted by dancqu
    D23, 7.5 grams metol and 100 grams sodium sulfite,
    is a complete film developer in itself. You then use
    a bath 2 for further development; some alkali?

    Do you use two bath for both film and paper?
    Is that second bath the same for the two?

    I compound all chemistry used and use
    all one-shot. Dan
    Hi Dan,

    Yup - same for both paper and film, I guess it's "divided" development because I do a soak in the D23 for approx 3 to 5 min for film and 1-1/2 to 3 min for paper, then I put it into the second bath for times which vary according to whether or not I've deliberately (or mistakenly ) over or under exposed the film. The second bath for me is sodium metaborate, which I think Ole has identified as Borax and which I seem to remember also being called "washing soda"? The idea (short and simple) is that a short bath in "A" gets the developer into the emulsion without any real developing happening, then the activator in "B" gets the developing going, but the absorbed developer is soon exhausted in the highlights, so they don't get all burned out, while it keeps working in the shadows and you end up with good shadow detail.
    I know that there are people here in APUG who can describe this correctly for you - far better than my amateur attempt here.

    Oh yeah I have also used Rodinal one shot and I liked it, but it's a liquid, and I'm sure it will freeze in cold enough weather. The only reasons that I wanted to learn to mix from dry chemicals is that 1) I will have a need in the future for chemicals that I can "pack" into the bush and use even in cold weather. This D23 stuff seems to fit the bill and it's cheap, and 2) dry stuff should be more rugged to pack and have an almost indefinite shelf life with less danger of spillage

    cheers eh?

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin