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  1. #11
    destroya's Avatar
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    just buy the raw chems. i think im in for $40 and thats enough, minus the distilled water and dektol, to do over 100 rolls. the main chem you use a lot of is the sodium sulphite, whoic is used in a lot of things. I just buy the 5 pound jug.

  2. #12
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Hummm, what temperature for those times? 68F is almost impossible to get in my darkroom without trudging ice downstairs, for much of the year. And does the developer foam so much I couldn't use it in my Jobo?

    I have a big jug of sulphite. As you say, very useful stuff.

    It would be nice if a 400 film I would also use for other things would work properly, Tri-X by preference, HP5+ would be ok too. I had an experience with Ultrafine some time ago that had me swearing to never buy anything from them again. If it's made for them by Harman maybe Kentmere 400?

  3. #13
    destroya's Avatar
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    my last batch was done at 70, but its usually 68. I've also had good luck with the xtreme 400 fillm. very similar to hp5 but no AH layer. its a nice cheap film in 120 and only $30 for a bulk 100 foot roll. I've not tried tri-x with reversal as I save that film for other projects, usually diafine and 1250 iso stuff.

  4. #14

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    Hello doestroya,
    I'm using Iron Out as 2nd developer but compared with Tetenal Dokumol or any other developer it gives a sepia/olive tone to the positives. Do you get this result too ? I lose also 1 stop with Iron out, but this is correctible.
    For example with Fomapan R, I get this (Iron Out on bottom, Dokumol 1+9 on top) :
    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #15
    destroya's Avatar
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    yes I do get the color change, but its more pronounce depending on the film. Iron out is nice because it does so many things in 1 easy simple step

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tofek View Post
    Hello doestroya,
    I'm using Iron Out as 2nd developer but compared with Tetenal Dokumol or any other developer it gives a sepia/olive tone to the positives. Do you get this result too ? I lose also 1 stop with Iron out, but this is correctible.
    For example with Fomapan R, I get this (Iron Out on bottom, Dokumol 1+9 on top) :
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	969.5 KB 
ID:	87772

    You are not actually loosing a stop per se. The iron out develops to completion and you probably were not going far enough before. Try 1st developing more.
    Get it right in the camera, the first time...

  7. #17
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    Neat! I will have to try this!

    scanning them (I know its taboo, but thought I would just throw this out there), I find that the both films give less grain when compared to a scanned neg of the same emulsion. Not sure why but it seems that way to my eyes.
    Surely others may know more, but I believe the apparently finer grain is because reversal processing first develops the larger, faster, more sensitive grains as a negative and then bleaches them away. The slower, smaller grains are then fogged and developed as the positive image. So, the grain may actually be finer.
    All this has happened before, and all this will happen again.

  8. #18
    mrred's Avatar
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    That is also how it was explained to me.
    Get it right in the camera, the first time...

  9. #19
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    bookmarked

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by kb3lms View Post
    Neat! I will have to try this!



    Surely others may know more, but I believe the apparently finer grain is because reversal processing first develops the larger, faster, more sensitive grains as a negative and then bleaches them away. The slower, smaller grains are then fogged and developed as the positive image. So, the grain may actually be finer.
    Exactly, you are right with this explanation. That is the main reason transparencies have this bit finer grain appearence.
    If you choose the best imaging chain for looking at your transparencies = projection with an excellent projector / projection lens, you see it immediately:
    A projected slide on e.g. 1m x 1,5m screen, compared to a print from a negative of the same size side by side, looks significantly finer in grain with better detail rendition
    (in colour that is even more visible than in BW).

    I love doing wet prints on classic silver gelatin paper in my darkroom. I will never stop that.

    But slide projection, both BW and Colour, is absolutely unique in its quality for big enlargements and unsurpassed brillance.
    It is a wonderful addition to my printing.
    And I will never stop that, too.

    Film offers the best satisfaction if we use all that it can give us.
    "Either - or" thinking is limiting our delight.
    "Both and" , "as well as" thinking is maximizing our delight.

    Best regards,
    Henning

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