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  1. #21

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    I processed tank and hanger years ago. I don't remember any
    problems. I built my own tanks. I think a well proportioned one
    liter tank may handle four to six sheets. You might even
    consider making the hangers.

    Thinking back, there is hardly any agitation involved. Dan

  2. #22

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    I'm a tank processer, have been for 17 years. The only film I don't process in the big tanks is 35mm. had lots of surge problems. But for 8x10 4x5 and 120 I use both rubber and stainless steele 3 1/2 gallon tanks. Dip and dunk I think they call it. The hangers are loaded onto racks, then all the film is submerged at once. The tanks if you keep a eye out are fairly easy to find. Cheaply!. The racks and hangers are a bit more of a hassle though. I've tried every different way my least favorite was the drum with motors. After this experimentation the best way for me was definately dip and dunk.
    Stop trying to get into my mind, There is nothing there!

  3. #23

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    I've developed a few hundred 4x5 sheets using single sheet hangers in a SS gallon tank. Piece of cake, works very nice. No uneven film yet. Drop the film in (maybe 10 sheets at a time) lift, 45 deg. to the left, drop in tank, lift 45 deg to the right, repeat every minute. It does use a fair amount of chemistry, that's the only downside for me. I have two tanks filled with dev + fix (the stop is a larger beaker that they fit into) because I only have two!

  4. #24
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    For What it is worth,
    I have tried the motor driven devices even had a Wing Lynch system, but still prefer the ease of tank (dip and dunk) developing. Never in over fifty years have I had a negative fall out of a holder, 4x5, 5x7 or 8x10. When ever I tray develop I destroy more than I can keep. Even used to trim the corners off sheet film with finger nail clippers to try to avert scratching. I can do six sheets of paper at one time, but can't do even one perfect sheet of film. I know my limitations and what is easiest for me, so I use tanks and hangers.

    Stainless is wonderful if temperature controll is necessary, but hard rubber will hold their ambient temp for a longer time. For B&W I prefer rubber, for color C41 or E6 I like the stainless in a temperature controlled water bath.

  5. #25
    BarrieB's Avatar
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    Greetings; I use three Kodak Hard Rubber Tanks for 4 X 5 Black & White negatives with the film loaded into SS Hangers, just dip and lift to drain every 30 seconds, never had a problem: Also I have made a SKINNY Dev. tank out of PVC that holds 6oo Ml which is economical when I process only one or two sheets. BTW this method is also handy for 'Developing by inspection' as the hangers car be lifted up and out without damage to the film, Cheers .

  6. #26

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    Aug 2004
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    Canada
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    Here is the single 5x7 hanger...

    Here is a tank with hangers in 5x7... You could use anything else for the other chemisty (fix, stop, washes... Having larger tanks isn't too much an issue when you're reusing chemistry - so much developer is 1 shot so special tanks are more important IMO)

    Here is another kit in 5x7.

    Good luck!

    joe

  7. #27

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    Thanks folks for all the help.

    Charles. You have no idea how good it makes me feel that another person can't tray process effectively. I can do one sheet but anymore and I'm bound to screw one of them up, if not more.

    It is also good to here that there are no problems with, I think they are called surge marks. I will look into these and give them a try.
    Technological society has succeeded in multiplying the opportunities for pleasure, but it has great difficulty in generating joy. Pope Paul VI

    So, I think the "greats" were true to their visions, once their visions no longer sucked. Ralph Barker 12/2004

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    Downers Grove Illinois
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    The best way to use hangarg is wth the hangar rack that holds the ss hangars. That way you can move 8 4x5 negs at one time. You need the ss tanks Arkay makes.

    Hand holding the hangars causes them to fan out at the bottom and be difficult to get back into the tank. I limited myself to four in a 1/2 gal Kodak tank.

    Now I have the complete process line from Arkay with one new tank and hangar rack they made in January for me.

    The only trick is raise slowly, tip 45 deg right, go vertical, and replace slowly. Repeat 2 times for 1 agitation cycle. Tip left for the second half. It takes 15 sec to go in and out of solution 2 times. There will be no surge marks if you go slow enough, in fact it never happened to me at all.

  9. #29
    Charles Webb's Avatar
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    Another for what it's worth comment.
    I have had excellent results developing 35mm and 120 roll film in my dip and dunk tanks, I use the T shaped wire supplied with the old Nikkor tanks, and simply put the wire device through the middle of the loaded reel or reels,
    I normally do two at a time. Gently lower the reels and wire into the tank,
    lift gently so as not to cause a surge and set back down. I do the gentle
    lift and set back down 5 sec each 30 sec for the duration, lift out a few seconds early to drain, and gently into stop bath, again with very gentle up and down agitation motion. Have Never had any kind of problem when using
    this technique on roll film in larger tanks. If I am using a special developer,
    I fill the double tank and do the same procedure in the dark. I again drain then go into stop, then to fixer using the same gentle lifting procedure.

    I have never known of surge marks being cause by holes in the hanger frame
    unless far too much viger was used during the initial contact and agitation in the developer. After 15 seconds or so in the developer, I lift the hangers on one side up about an inch, the let them drop against the tank lip which dislodges any air bubbles. I simply am not troubled by streaks, uneven developing pin holes or other things mentioned.

    I also never found it necessary to load a film hanger with the emulsion in a special way. I has not made one wit of difference with the emulsion in to
    the hanger, or the emulsion facing out of the hanger. The way you introduce
    the hangers and film to the developer is what can cause problems. To vigerous cause streaks etc, not enough can cause uneven development.
    Do it like "the great yellow God in Rochester has always recommended, and your negatives will thank you for the extra care you gave them! Gently up and rock to the left and down, back up then rock to the right and down.
    Lift the ends of the hangers with both hands, not the center of the hanger
    which causes them to fan toward and away from you. Be gentle!

    No rocket Science here...........

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