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  1. #21
    /dev/null's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaZ99 View Post
    OP doesn't mention the subject. What kind of night photography are you thinking of?
    I know it is a B&W question, however, would you consider the color film? This is half an hour exposure (Provia 100F):

    Subject would be cityscapes, office buildings and maybe catch a train passing by. At this 1 location I shoot about 30min after the sun goes down:

    Cambo Wide / Schneider Kreuznach @72mm
    f/5.6
    ISO 3200 (Delta 400 @3200)
    Shutter speed 1/4 - 1/2


    Would be nice if I could catch the train in motion, slightly blurred but not too much. The train passes quite slow, maybe 10-15 miles an hour. I already made some shots, but just finding out if another film would make the image a bit better than the pushed Delta (less 'harsh', 'dirty' and pushed like).

    I also have some boxes left of the Fuji Acros 400 on 120, maybe I can use that instead?

    Thanks.

  2. #22
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Another vote Acros100
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by /dev/null View Post
    Subject would be cityscapes, office buildings and maybe catch a train passing by.
    Yet another vote for Acros 100.

  4. #24
    /dev/null's Avatar
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    OK, thanks.

    Do I shoot the Acros 100 @100 or would 400 be ok? I mean, I would like to catch some image of the train passing...

  5. #25
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Tmax 100 is a good film for night exposures. I'm also fond of Ilford FP4+. I've heard good things about Acros 100 but never used it. From what I understand, the TMax 100 has similar reciprocity characteristics to Acros, although perhaps not as good.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    Tmax 100 is a good film for night exposures. I'm also fond of Ilford FP4+. I've heard good things about Acros 100 but never used it. From what I understand, the TMax 100 has similar reciprocity characteristics to Acros, although perhaps not as good.
    Definitely not as good. Fujifilm Acros can go 120 seconds without any compensation needed. TMAX 100 needs additional exposure starting at ONE second.

  7. #27
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RattyMouse View Post
    Definitely not as good. Fujifilm Acros can go 120 seconds without any compensation needed. TMAX 100 needs additional exposure starting at ONE second.
    from the Kodak data sheet (F4016) for T-Max films


    Adjustments for Long and Short Exposures - T-Max 100

    If Indicated
    Exposure Time Is
    (Seconds)
    Use This
    Lens-Aperture
    Adjustment
    OR This Adjusted
    Exposure Time
    (Seconds)
    1/10,000 +1/3 stop Change
    Aperture
    1/1000 None None
    1/100 None None
    1/10 None None
    1 +1/3 stop Change
    Aperture
    10 +1/2 stop 15
    100 +1 stop 200
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  8. #28
    StoneNYC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    from the Kodak data sheet (F4016) for T-Max films


    Adjustments for Long and Short Exposures - T-Max 100

    If Indicated
    Exposure Time Is
    (Seconds)
    Use This
    Lens-Aperture
    Adjustment
    OR This Adjusted
    Exposure Time
    (Seconds)
    1/10,000 +1/3 stop Change
    Aperture
    1/1000 None None
    1/100 None None
    1/10 None None
    1 +1/3 stop Change
    Aperture
    10 +1/2 stop 15
    100 +1 stop 200
    I still agree Acros is SIMPLER for up to 2 minutes.

    However I also don't like the "oh you have to correct it by aperture" thing, because I choose my aperture and depth of field VERY carefully, and I don't want to have to lose the depth because they wanted to make their film look like it had better reciprocity by bit adjusting the time properly and instead adjusting the aperture. I find that a cop out.
    ~Stone | "...of course, that's just my opinion. I could be wrong." ~Dennis Miller

  9. #29

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    for years i used tmx(100) for night exposures
    never let me down processed in sprint
    i used it f22@45 seconds but could have easily
    shot it at faster speeds opened up

    sodium vapor lamps are helpful

  10. #30
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I still agree Acros is SIMPLER for up to 2 minutes.

    However I also don't like the "oh you have to correct it by aperture" thing, because I choose my aperture and depth of field VERY carefully, and I don't want to have to lose the depth because they wanted to make their film look like it had better reciprocity by bit adjusting the time properly and instead adjusting the aperture. I find that a cop out.
    It only recommends an aperture-only adjustment when the difference is just 1/3 of a stop. Otherwise, in most cases it gives you both options.

    On what camera do you have a shutter that allows you to make an accurate adjustment that will increase an exposure of 1 second by 1/3 stop? Or an exposure of 1/10,000 second by 1/3 stop?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

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