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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by shutterboy View Post
    Also, sometimes, I prefer to rub my palms on parts of the print while it is in developer bath to increase the blacks.
    I hope you are wearing gloves, or using a metol-free developer. Mind you, add hydroquinone and phenidone to the list of things you don't want skin contact with. Metol-induced dermatitis will be the end of the pleasure you experience in the darkroom.

    Using developing time for paper density is a recipe for inconsistency and potential longer term problems. It is much better to develop the paper fully, and get the density you need through proper exposure, including burning and dodging. If the blacks in your prints are properly exposed, they will not require special shenanigans to develop. You can simply use your paper tongs to agitate the developer a bit, or lift and submerge the paper or rock the tray gently, so that the developer is not stagnant over any particular area. Make sure the developer is fresh and warm enough (20 C), and all should be well.

    As far as paper is concerned, FB has its beauty. But behind glass most papers look more or less the same.

    Anyway, kind gesture of you to offer to print it for him. You deserve a nod for that.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Sintchak (rich815) View Post
    Surprised no one said anything: beautiful image!
    Thank you sir! I was reluctant to post the link because 1) I'm not a subscriber (yet) and I believe the general consensus favors becoming a subscriber and posting images in the gallery over posting a link and 2) I was afraid it would come off as bragging/self-promotion, which was not my intent.

    In truth, the image was a happy accident and I didn't think it was worthy of consideration for a photo of the day. I simply ran out of faster film, loaded up the 100 speed (Acros, I think... either that or Fomapan), and did the best I could. It was the only shot on the roll that turned out okay. It was my first attempt at developing my own B&W and I forgot to leave my cell phone outside the bathroom while winding the film onto the reel... a phone call came in and the phone lit up the room. (DOH!!)

    John

  3. #23

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    I quite agree. The image is really great.

    Quote Originally Posted by shutterboy View Post
    OR, blame my professor. I have not aged either of the papers to determine their archival characteristics. If you say both are equal, so be it.



    Well, yeah I would say it is not standard. But it works for me. Again, learnt this technique from my professor.
    Tell your professor to come take some classes at Clemson to learn proper printing techniques . Haha, just kidding. I don't know where you go to school, but I couldn't help to get that Clemson VS USC jab in.

  4. #24
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The technique of rubbing the print to bring out detail has a great pedigree - all of it in old time newspaper darkrooms!
    "Stop the presses - I`ve got a great photo for page 1 here in the developer!"
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #25

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    Interesting image, I like the abstract pattern and the composition. I recommend to print in 30x40 at least. Starting with that size prints start to look impressive.

    Also, I am interested, what different ideas for an interpretation in print APUG members might come up with.

    Lars

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