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  1. #11
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    I like to read that article if publicly available.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    As you probably heard, California is going through a serious drought. Currently, I wash prints with 2 water wasting ways. first one is a Kodak tray siphon and my second method is my old Arkay tumbling print washer. I want to build a DIY, low water consumption print washer. What's the least amount of water a washer could use and still remain effective in washing prints? I print mostly 8x10. Right now, I do use hypo clear with all my fiber prints. Looks like this summer, not many folks here are going to water their lawns which I think it's a waste of water anyway. I don't think washing FB print is a waste of water, but I want to do it more efficiently.
    That depends on how many 10" X 8" prints you are washing?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  3. #13

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    Use tray rinses in a little fresh water to dilute any carry over fixer right down - you only want to wash out the emulsion and base. After that it is wash aid and soaking with periodic flushing of the washer. My wash tank drain goes to the ornamental side of the garden where it will do some good - the fixer residue is minimal. The tray rinses are treated as fixer for disposal.

    By removing as much excess fixer as I can, I can wait until I have a full tank for washing. I am thinking of making a smaller set of dividers for my Versalab so I can put in a displacement box to reduce the volume for small batches.
    I feel, therefore I photograph.

  4. #14
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    My usual 12 per batch

    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    That depends on how many 10" X 8" prints you are washing?
    I usually make about a dozen or so.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  5. #15
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    Efficient washing depends on complete changes of water and water temperature and I would guess that for fibre based prints, something like 30 minutes in a Nova slot wash tank with water about 12C would do the trick.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #16
    Maris's Avatar
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    Thrift has its place. I routinely wash about 40 fibre based 8x10s in two batches in a Paterson Major archival washer that features continuous flow and rocking agitation. Total water usage is about 150 litres which costs me about 40 cents. That's a bargain compared to the price of even one sheet of photographic paper not to mention test strips, failed proofs, etc.
    Photography, the word itself, invented and defined by its author Sir John.F.W.Herschel, 14 March 1839 at the Royal Society, Somerset House, London. Quote "...Photography or the application of the Chemical rays of light to the purpose of pictorial representation,..". unquote.

  7. #17

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    You should read mysteries of the vortex http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...php?t=296print (part 1) and http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&sou...xR9J8jKXQhoped (part 2). It was written by the owner of Silverprint and is a thorough investigation of FB print washing.

    Basic conclusion is you need surprisingly little water but you do need movement of water over the paper surface to aid defusion of fixer out of the paper.

    HCA and short fix times are your friend.

    I use fewer changes of water but regular manual agitation to wash my prints.

  8. #18
    bvy
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simonh82 View Post
    Basic conclusion is you need surprisingly little water but you do need movement of water over the paper surface to aid defusion of fixer out of the paper.
    Drum and motor base?

  9. #19

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    I recommend The Mysteries of the Vortex as well.

    If water is really at such a premium, it would be well worth doing a test. I'd think a slot washer, e.g., a standing, "archival" type would be the best for batches of 12 prints. Trays are just too much of a hassle with larger batches. One with a small volume would be best for water saving.

    Then, fill your washer, shut off the water flow but keep the washer full, and insert the prints to be tested (you could use regular prints with adequate borders for testing, or use fixed and HCAd white paper). Agitate by hand every, say, five minutes by lifting and dropping them. After 10 minutes, pull a print and test for adequate washing using a residual hypo test (e.g., Kodak HT-2). Change the water in the washer by draining and refilling. Pull a print and test again after another 10 minutes. Dump and refill again. Keep going in 10 minute intervals till you have a well-washed print then add a safety margin. I imagine you will come out at about two changes of water and at 25-30 minutes total wash time.

    Best,

    Doremus

  10. #20

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    Maincoonmaniac - Mysteries of the Vortex was the article I was referring to. I only have the original magazines (from 1996) and wasn't sure they would be available online but you've got links to it now from several others above.

    It is an interesting read highlighting the key variables I mentioned earlier.

    To be honest, I think it would be hard to beat the Ilford method you seem to already be using, but with manual shuffling/agitation in trays with fills/dumps or a siphon rather than in an archival washer.

    Also do not neglect temperature. Room temp water will wash more efficiently than cold water, although the hypo clearing agent mitigates this somewhat.

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