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  1. #21

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    I use a slot washer. At first, I have water moving quite fast, maximum speed without overflowing which isn't actually much. Then I slow the water movement to bare minimum. Then wash for 30 minutes. Rationale is, I want to get rid of what's on surface quickly. Rest is diffusion anyway so it's going to be slow. I just want water moving.

    So far, no issues. I have no idea what the total water usage is, but it can't all that much looking at how much it flowed out.

    This reply doesn't establish anything in terms of minimum but this is what I do.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  2. #22
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    I agree with this as being a very good method if you are in an area with water shortages.

    QUOTE=Doremus Scudder;1645426]I recommend The Mysteries of the Vortex as well.

    If water is really at such a premium, it would be well worth doing a test. I'd think a slot washer, e.g., a standing, "archival" type would be the best for batches of 12 prints. Trays are just too much of a hassle with larger batches. One with a small volume would be best for water saving.

    Then, fill your washer, shut off the water flow but keep the washer full, and insert the prints to be tested (you could use regular prints with adequate borders for testing, or use fixed and HCAd white paper). Agitate by hand every, say, five minutes by lifting and dropping them. After 10 minutes, pull a print and test for adequate washing using a residual hypo test (e.g., Kodak HT-2). Change the water in the washer by draining and refilling. Pull a print and test again after another 10 minutes. Dump and refill again. Keep going in 10 minute intervals till you have a well-washed print then add a safety margin. I imagine you will come out at about two changes of water and at 25-30 minutes total wash time.

    Best,

    Doremus[/QUOTE]

  3. #23
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Long ago I sometimes had to make many 8x10 prints on RC paper. With a washing aid and perhaps longer washes, the same technique would work with fiber paper. The prints were washed about 30 at a time in deep plastic dish trays with constant shuffling. After a few minutes they were transferred to a second tray and the process repeated, then to a final tray, again with constant shuffling. The first tray was then dumped and filled from the second tray. The second tray was filled from the third tray, which was filled with fresh water. The process was labor intensive, but otherwise efficient. It used only a few ounces of water per print. Those prints from 40 years ago have survived in good condition.

  4. #24
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Uqee

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  5. #25
    bvy
    bvy is online now

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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
    That's the only part I understood.

  6. #26
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Sorry I did not write 'Uqee'. May be my little daughter playing with the Nexus tab. Sorry again for the noise.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  7. #27
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    They thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Simonh82 View Post
    You should read mysteries of the vortex http://www.film-and-darkroom-user.or...php?t=296print (part 1) and http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&sou...xR9J8jKXQhoped (part 2). It was written by the owner of Silverprint and is a thorough investigation of FB print washing.

    Basic conclusion is you need surprisingly little water but you do need movement of water over the paper surface to aid defusion of fixer out of the paper.

    HCA and short fix times are your friend.

    I use fewer changes of water but regular manual agitation to wash my prints.
    Thanks for the link! Great article. Looks like short fix times can go a long way in saving water. I'm going to copy the article for my reference.

    Times have change. When I was a kid in the town of Sacramento, people wasted water. The town has access to to rivers. The Sacramento River and the American River. People used to use their hoses to spray leaves off their lawns and washed their sidewalks.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

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