Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 69,916   Posts: 1,521,915   Online: 1082
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 27
  1. #1
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,908
    Images
    6

    Least amount of water to wash fiber based prints

    As you probably heard, California is going through a serious drought. Currently, I wash prints with 2 water wasting ways. first one is a Kodak tray siphon and my second method is my old Arkay tumbling print washer. I want to build a DIY, low water consumption print washer. What's the least amount of water a washer could use and still remain effective in washing prints? I print mostly 8x10. Right now, I do use hypo clear with all my fiber prints. Looks like this summer, not many folks here are going to water their lawns which I think it's a waste of water anyway. I don't think washing FB print is a waste of water, but I want to do it more efficiently.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,534
    It is a diffusion process. You have to do some testing, but I recall reading some reports in Photo Techniques years ago which showed "archival" levels could be achieved with surprisingly small quantities of water. I'll try to find the articles.

    I'm assuming you are using fiber-based paper. To minimize washing requirements, there are additional processing steps to take before the washing step:

    1) Use a rapid fixer with short fixing times (no hardener)
    2) Be very conservative on fixer capacity
    3) Use a hypo clearing agent (see Ilford's archival sequence for example)
    4) Use a neutral-alkaline rapid fixer instead of a standard acidic fixer

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    790
    To minimize water use the trick is to do a series of still-water soaks rather than running the faucet continuously. Depending on the kind of tray or tank you are using, and on your chemistry sequence and water characteristics, you will have to experiment to find what mix of sitting in still water, agitation in still water, dumps and refills, and final brief rinse in running water is required to get a clean wash. But it can be done. The tradeoff is that you spend more of your time and labor in order to save the water.

  4. #4
    Double Negative's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    New York
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    81
    A standing soak helps, as does the use of a hypo clear agent. The latter cuts wash times in half. I'm a big fan of Perma Wash (made by Heico).

  5. #5
    baachitraka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Bremen, Germany.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,265
    I soak in 1l of solution made up of 10g Sodium Sulfite, sometimes overnight, I have no idea what effect does it have. After I rinse and put it in a tray of water and change once in a hour.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  6. #6
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,908
    Images
    6

    Thanks for looking for the article

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    It is a diffusion process. You have to do some testing, but I recall reading some reports in Photo Techniques years ago which showed "archival" levels could be achieved with surprisingly small quantities of water. I'll try to find the articles.
    My method is to do a short fix with rapid fixer, then put the prints in a holding tray of water. After that, I use a second round fresh fix for a minute than a 5 minute wash. Then I soak the prints in hypo clear for 10 minutes than wash for another 5 minutes. Both print washers use tons of water though.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  7. #7
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    5,820
    Images
    31
    I just received notice that our water company is raising rates to home owners 112.4% as of June 1 this year. Commercial rates go up 46% and industrial rates by a mere 38%. Guess my already sparse conservative methods get even more stringent, and I may be forced to use RC paper exclusively.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Montreal, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,534
    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    My method is to do a short fix with rapid fixer, then put the prints in a holding tray of water. After that, I use a second round fresh fix for a minute than a 5 minute wash. Then I soak the prints in hypo clear for 10 minutes than wash for another 5 minutes. Both print washers use tons of water though.
    I'll post tomorrow when I find the article but it was along the lines of the soaking advice you're been getting (again since it is a diffusion process you don't needs lots of moving water). However the minimal water soak may or may not be problematic when doing more than one print at a time. It may be more of a theoretical than practical approach. Either way though, you don't needs tons of water. That's one of the reasons I always liked the good old Kodak tray siphon, although it obviously works less efficiently with more prints in the tray, and required some manual work shuffling etc.

  9. #9
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,623
    Images
    14
    It must be pointed out that a bunch of prints sitting on top of each other will need some type of shuffling for the fixer to go somewhere, I have heard the sit and dump method works very well and if I lived in California I would be thinking about this method of washing.


    I use a non hardening rapid two fixer bath, prints sit in a low volume water replacement tray with holes drilled into the bottom, I then hypo clear for five minutes making sure I shuffle the prints from bottom to top, then into the vertical washers for 20 minutes.

  10. #10
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,908
    Images
    6
    I do like tray siphons too, but it doesn't work if the flow of water is slow. The siphon needs a wasteful amount of water before it works properly. It is more efficient with more prints. You do have to keep the prints moving. Thanks again for posting the article.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin