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  1. #11
    TheToadMen's Avatar
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    Ilford FP4+ and HP5+. Rate it from ISO 50 to ISO 800.
    And bring a pencil to mark the used ISO on each roll when exposed.
    "Have fun and catch that light beam!"
    Bert from Holland
    my blog: http://thetoadmen.blogspot.nl
    my Linkedin pinhole group: http://tinyurl.com/pinholegroup


    * I'm an analogue enthusiast, trying not to fall into the digital abyss.
    * My favorite cameras: Nikon S2, Hasselblad SWC, Leica SL, Leica M7, Russian FKD 18x24, Bronica SQ-B and RF645, Rolleiflex T, Nikon F4s, Olympus Pen FT, Agfa Clack and my pinhole cameras.

  2. #12
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    +1

    You won't need a slower film. And you probably won't need faster than 400, either. Take 70% of the total quantity in FP4 and 30% of HP5 (for evening or interior shots). If the contrast gets too high, rate FP4 @ 50 and underdevelop it a bit.

  3. #13
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG Erik,

    A medium speed film (ISO 100-200ish) like FP4+ will work great as long as you are comfortable with larger apertures (shorter DOF) when it gets darker. 1/125 at f4 is a decent setting for say open shade, 1/60 at f4 will probably work fine for you in full shade.

    If you want smaller apertures (longer DOF) or faster shutter speeds a high speed film (ISO 400 up) may be a better choice. I wouldn't worry to much about overexposing films like HP5+ (or Tmax 400, Delta 400...).

    These films are pretty flexible. Personally I'll expose these 400 speed films happily at EI ratings down to 50 to sneak in at 800 for some shots. For FP4+ I happily shoot down to 25 and up to 200 if needed.

    Pan F would be a great choice if you like short DOF mid day.
    Mark Barendt, Beaverton, OR

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  4. #14

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    Hi guys!

    This is appearantly a very active forum with very knowledgeble users!

    I will bring a variety of speeds and remember that it is possible to push and pull process film. Important note to self there I haven't done that much yet as I am currently getting the grip on DIY processing, darkroom and B/W film. Need to keep as few variables as possible in the beginning, but it's time for widening the usage of film and increasing my experience!

    Thank you for all the constructive responses!

    -erik

  5. #15
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    One thing to remember is that if you push a slow film or pull a fast film, you will change the grain and tonal reproduction. For some shots that will be the effect that you are after.

    But if you are just pushing or pulling to achieve the right shutter speed or aperture, you are usually better off using a film with the correct speed to start with.

    If I am shooting daylight scenery in spring/summer I would not use 400 film or set my DSLR to 400. I'd use ~100 in both cases.

    On a recent trip to Madeira, I kept hitting the max shutter speed of 1/1000 despite stopping down and pulling the 400 film to 200. I'm unhappy with most of those images. The only thing I can think of is how it would have looked with FP4 (I was unable to stock up).

    Some analogue cameras tend to be less accurate the higher the shutter speed. This is a good reason to keep shutter speeds in the lower half. As you'll be more certain of your exposure.

  6. #16
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    I almost never push or pull regardless of the EI I shoot at, just a single normal process for each film.

  7. #17
    MattKrull's Avatar
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    Lots of different opinions here. Let me add mine

    Kodak Tmax400 - has more latitude than traditional grain films, one full stop up and down. So you can shoot it as a 200, 400, or 800 and process it the same. That's nice because then you don't have to write down which roll is what and worry about pushing or pulling your dev times. That will let you shoot EV 17 (really bright day on snow, shot at F16 1/400) down to EV 7 (brightly lit night time street shot, F4 1/60 hand held). That's a lot of flexibility without having to worry about which roll you've got loaded and what else you've shot on that roll.

  8. #18

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    I live at a somewhat higher altitude than where you are going (2200 m) in a pretty pollution free area. The sky is not usually a problem, although it can be very blue. A yellow filter is not a bad idea most of the time, but it may sometimes look artificial with some of today's films. You can always look at the scene through the filter and judge it if in doubt. I usually pack a small bag of filters (8, 11, 15, 25, polarizer) and choose whatever I need for the occasion. If I were getting new film, XP2 would probably be my first choice. It is fine grained, forgiving, and produces spectacular images. If you are just bringing stuff from your stock, FP4+ would probably be first choice, especially if you are using a tripod most of the time. If you will be shooting in marginal light or be using the camera handheld a lot, HP5+ would be preferable. It still has very fine grain and has excellent tonality.

  9. #19

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    Ii see that a few recommend using XP2. But that is a C-41 emulsion, right? Would you develop that in standard B/W chemistry?

  10. #20

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    Hi

    No XP2 needs C41 processing unless you want to eliminate its good points.

    mini lab or c41 kit at home or mix with scales though the developer is getting difficult to source.

    XP2 allows you to shoot at 100 ISO during day and at 800 ISO in evening and use same mini lab without altering process- it will wet print ok at 800 ISO but you may not like the shadows at 8x10.

    It's dye image is different from silver.

    Some people use 1600!

    Id never try to push or underexpose normal film it makes printing very difficult and horrible prints.

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