Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,939   Posts: 1,557,396   Online: 979
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3

    Request film recommendation

    Hi!

    I am traveling to southern Italy in the beginning of next month where I will be hiking at about 1500-2000 meters altitude. I expect sunshine, but who knows really(?). So my question is what film to bring. I will use a Fuji GA645i medium format compact. Largest aperture is 4 and fastest shutter speed is merely 1/400s. I will shoot nature, people, mostly outdoors, mainly B/W.

    I am mostly concerned about the rather slow shutter speeds the camera is capable of and thus I might have to use a slow film. But bringing too much slow film is risky, as it may be under exposed too easily. Faster film like e.g 400 requires faster speeds which I don't have. An ND filter might be able to help me out, but this is all about experience and I lack that. I have loads of PAN F, some FP4 and a few HP5+ in the fridge.

    Does anyone have any good advice?

    BR
    Erik

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,057
    Images
    33
    Carry primarily 400 speed and use a yellow filter to reduce haze, plus it cuts shutter speed.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  3. #3
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    FP4, Ektar and Provia?

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Glasgow, UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    61
    Quote Originally Posted by vlazdir View Post
    Hi!

    I am traveling to southern Italy in the beginning of next month where I will be hiking at about 1500-2000 meters altitude. I expect sunshine, but who knows really(?). So my question is what film to bring. I will use a Fuji GA645i medium format compact. Largest aperture is 4 and fastest shutter speed is merely 1/400s. I will shoot nature, people, mostly outdoors, mainly B/W.

    I am mostly concerned about the rather slow shutter speeds the camera is capable of and thus I might have to use a slow film. But bringing too much slow film is risky, as it may be under exposed too easily. Faster film like e.g 400 requires faster speeds which I don't have. An ND filter might be able to help me out, but this is all about experience and I lack that. I have loads of PAN F, some FP4 and a few HP5+ in the fridge.

    Does anyone have any good advice?

    BR
    Erik
    Just so that you're aware, if you stop down to f/11 or smaller, the GA645 is capable of 1/700.

    When I'm seriously unsure about light and other conditions and I want to shoot B&W, I usually opt for either Fuji Neopan 400CN or Ilford XP2. You can expose them at EIs between 100 to 800 on the same roll and still good results. Check out the published specifications for these films; both are C41 process B&W films made by Ilford.

    For colour film in similar situations, I usually opt for Kodak Portra 400.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    The Land of the Yellow Box
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    112
    I have the same camera. If I could use only one film, I would take the 400. By the way the shutter does go up to 1/700 at f/11 and smaller. Since you only get 15 or 16 shots a roll depending on whether you have a later or earlier model, you could just bring a variety of films since you might have to change rolls often anyway. But the range of speeds and apertures on the Fuji will cover the brightest light you will ever encounter even with ISO 400. Worst case scenario would be 1/400th at f/22, which is sunny 16 minus one stop for snow. Mother Nature does not get brighter than that.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    1,341
    I second Ilford XP2 Super. I use it in situations where light is changing quickly and I'm using a camera with limited shutter speeds.

  7. #7
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    He doesn't need fast film.

    The light is very strong in the mediterranean this time of year, especially in the mountains, and even if it's over-cast.

    For mountain scenes you really need maximum tones and minimal grain to pick out all the subtle details in a vast scene with great distances.

    ISO 100 will do just fine.

    I have done the mistake of bringing mainly 400 film to a similar location. At least I have the memories, but not the pictures I wanted.

  8. #8
    Regular Rod's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    505
    Use HP5 Plus and FP4 Plus. Take yellow and orange filters, a spotmeter and a tripod with you. When you get back use a compensating developer like OBSIDIAN AQUA.

    RR

  9. #9
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    496
    An additional suggestion would be to bring film that you are very familiar with. If you use film that you are not familiar with in an environment that you are not familiar with, the results will likely be unfamiliar.

    And do take some colour film too, even if it's not your main medium.

    I recently shot a lot of sea and mountain scenes with mainly Neopan 400 (which is a film I know and love).

    My only thought on that now that is that I shouldn't have.
    Last edited by Jaf-Photo; 05-08-2014 at 04:23 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #10
    Bill Burk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    3,429
    Images
    46
    I'm familiar with 400 TMAX, and so I know that it can handle a bit of overexposure gracefully, and it works very comfortably at EI 250. Medium Format means you will not notice grain as much as if you were shooting 35mm. If you were to take a 100 speed film, you could get some amazing fine-grain photographs, but will you use a tripod? Otherwise you might hand-hold, like I do. I get better handheld photographs on EI 250.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin