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Thread: 120 Drip Dry ?

  1. #1

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    120 Drip Dry ?

    I thought I'd set my Jobo squeegee aside. Can I
    expect spotless results using a few drops of Photo
    Flo in distilled water as a last rinse then drip dry?

    This roll of Pan F+ 120 to be processed in Ansco/
    Beers A at 1:19 dilution is a TEST of new/used
    equipment and the film's processing. Dan

  2. #2
    david b's Avatar
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    I normally drip dry after about 30 seconds in photo flo....no problems for me.

  3. #3

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    Good Afternoon, Dancqu,

    I agree with david b. No squeegee ever, and dilute the Photo-Flo a lot more than Kodak recommends.

    Konical

  4. #4
    Ole
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    My routine now is a good soak in clean water - distilled if necessary. Then just hang up to dry. I haven't had a single drying mark after I stopped using Photo-Flo or similar.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5

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    NEVER a squeegee! I did it once and it ripped the emulsion of the film in nice, long strips. A few drops of Photo-Flo and I hang to dry. No marks.

  6. #6
    Mongo's Avatar
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    As long as I've been developing film (I think I started back when dinosaurs roamed the earth...) I've taken it from the final rinse, put it into a dish pan with tap water and a few drops of PhotoFlo, pulled it out by one end, and hung it up to dry. I've never had a single mark from drying. (For 35mm I still give it a gentle "snap" to get some of the water out of the sprocket holes, but 120 comes straight out of the water and onto a clip.)

    These days I dry my film in a bag that's designed to hand in a closet to protect clothes. It's about 2' square by 6' tall, and has a zipper up the front. No dust problems with this arrangement
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  7. #7
    Jon Shiu's Avatar
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    I recently stopped using LFN and distilled water. Instead, I squeegee with an absorbent photo wipe (the green kind). I cut the photo wipe down to 2 or 3in. piece and then wrap it front and back around the top of the film, which is pinned to a line in the shower. Then holding the edges of the green thing on each side of the film, very slowly squeegee down the length of the film. Has worked fine. I stopped using wetting agent because I didn't like how it gunks up my Patterson reel and may also contribute to foaming. Also don't need distilled water or LFN any more.

  8. #8

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    I soak in Photo-Flo and distilled water. Photo-Flo sometimes likes to form these enormous bubbles that annoy me, so I sometimes run my fingers down the film to clear them, but I probably shouldn't and it's really unnecessary. You should be fine.

  9. #9

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    I never squeegee rollfilm - or sheet film either. I rinse in distilled or deionized water with a few drops of LFN and hang to dry (for rollfilm I sometimes use a Honeywell Kleen Dry dryer).

    No drying marks.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongo
    These days I dry my film in a bag that's designed to hand in a closet to protect clothes. It's about 2' square by 6' tall, and has a zipper up the front. No dust problems with this arrangement
    I use the same "high-tech" film dryer after a 30-second soak in distilled water + Photo-Flo at half the amount recommended by Kodak. The negatives are spotless.

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