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  1. #1

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    HC-110 and Tri-X Pro 120 Times

    Hey everyone. I want to know if anyone knows of a dilution for HC-110 that will mimic the results of D-76 on Tri-X Pro. I have a time for dilution B of HC-110, and it's only about 5 minutes @70ºF. I'm looking for a longer time, therefore a greater dilution, while still getting a look similar to D-76, with the full speed of 320 and the relatively fine grain associated with D-76. I don't want any high-contrast horror stories! Can anyone help me? I would like to develop the film ASAP and HC-110 was the only developer the photo store I went to had. Also, is it possible to use HC-110 as a paper developer at a certain dilution? Thanks for all of your help.

    Regards.
    ~Karl Borowski

  2. #2

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    Good Evening, Karl,

    The dilutions for HC-110, directly from the concentrate are A--1:15, C--1:19, D--1:39, E--1:47, F--1:79, G--1:119, and H--1:63. I can't help much on achieving a "D-76 look" with HC-110, but my general observation is that I can't recall much difference between film processed in D-76 as opposed to film processed in HC-110B.

    I've heard of using the A solution for paper processing, but I've never tried it.

    Konical

  3. #3

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    What does dilution C look like in comparison to D-76, Konical? I am worried about using B with times being so short, as such short development times can supposedly lead to inconsistant, streaky results.

  4. #4
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  5. #5

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    Good Morning, Karl,

    I have only used Dilutions A, B, and (I think) F. Except for B, this was all many years ago before I changed over mostly to T-100 and T-400 in T-Max developer. I have the dilution information posted in my darkroom just in case I need it some time; it came from the site mentioned by Schmoo. All I can really suggest is some testing.

    Konical

  6. #6

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    One quick addendum to the last post: I have used HC-110B with 4 x 5 copy film which takes only 2 to 3 minute development time. This was drum-type processing with, of course, continuous agitation. No problem whatsoever with uneven development. I don't know if the same results would obtain using roll film, but I have, in the past, developed roll film and 35mm for fairly short times (4 to 5 minutes) and had no problems.

    Konical

  7. #7
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    I've used mostly Dilution H and Dilution G. IMO, H is close to D-76 1:1 (B is close to D-76 stock), and G is much better. If you don't have times for these, take a Dilution B time and add 50% for H with the same agitation scheme, as a starting point. For G, I approximately triple the B times, but I also cut agitation to once every 3 minutes (after continuous agitation for the first full minute). This can also seemingly vary with different films, but should always produce printable negatives and get you close enough to adjust in a couple rolls.

    FWIW, Dilution G with 3-minute agitation cycles produces an increase in film speed at normal contrast, also, something like 2/3 stop with TMY, possibly a full stop with 400TX. Grain is, IMO, less than with stronger dilutions, and contrast control can be done by altering agitation (more agitation = more contrast) without changing film speed.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.



 

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