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  1. #21
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    My thinking is that a highly diluted devoper will tend to exhaust in the denser areas during the rests while the shadows continue to develop, lowering contrast in a way that just cutting back on the overall developing time wouldn't accomplish. I assume that dropping the speed of the film will also be neccessary.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #22
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    I prefer to achieve what Flotsam says by making agitation less frequent.
    By diluting the developer you get similar results in longer times (IMHO). How little developer is necessary to develop a roll of film it's an open-ended question to which I had never received a satisfactory answer.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  3. #23
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    I am certainthat I have seen a "minimum amount of Rodinal concentrate per roll" somewhere but I have forgotten where and what it was
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    I am certain that I have seen a "minimum amount of Rodinal concentrate per roll" somewhere but I have forgotten where and what it was
    I have, too. Can remember it either...I don't believe in it either. I think it is something Agfa said to have us use more Rodinal.
    Of course it can be said that if you use a too little amount of Rodinal for a roll that the result will be of a poorer quality and 1+50 is the highest dilution recommended, but that is up to the photographer.
    If you do 1+300 stand dev with Rodinal and like it...then 1+300 is ok.

    Morten

  5. #25
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    I have used 1+200 rodinal a few times, when I guessstmated exposures. 2 hours in standing development does the trick. However I have always used 2ml rodinal +400 water (35mm) or 3ml r+600 water (120)

    I understand that the maximum gamma attainable will not be 0.65 or so but it doesn;t bug me, as I get pefectly printable negatives.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  6. #26
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    I was thinking in terms of an extreme example of developing Six rolls of 120 film in an invertable tank that requires nearly three liters of tank solution (30ml of concentrate at 1:100) or the same Six rolls in a Jobo rotary tank that requires less than 500 ml (5ml of concentrate). Will the results be the same? I know that Rodi is imbued with mystical, supernatural powers but does 5ml of concentrate have the poop to develop 480 sq. in. of film.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    My thinking is that a highly diluted devoper will tend to exhaust in the denser areas during the rests while the shadows continue to develop, lowering contrast in a way that just cutting back on the overall developing time wouldn't accomplish. I assume that dropping the speed of the film will also be neccessary.
    The compensation idea is fine, but 1) you should be able to shoot at least full speed if not more with a proper compensating developer, 2) in principle you may get edge effects that simply shortening development time wouldn't give you (though I never looked for them with this combination, and you'd probably need greater intervals between agitation) and 3) I haven't found that Rodinal even at 1:100 is a particularly good compensation developer, so you're probably right about dropping the speed. OTOH, Pan F+ in Rodinal does look good, compensation or no. OT3H, if you want shadow detail and a speed bump, consider a different developer.

  8. #28

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    I have found that 35mm PanF does beautifully in Rodinal at 1+50 for 11 minutes, but in 120 film, this is too long. My shadow details are there in both cases, however, with the 120 film, my highlights are out of control. I find that I need to print the larger negs at contrast 1-1.5, which doesn't give me a lot of wiggle room, especially if I want to split diffuse. Flashing the paper seems to help, but I needed to rethink my method.
    I have since found the ideal for my 120 negs is to shoot them at EI 40 and develop at 1+50 for 10 minutes with 15 seconds of initial inversions followed by 3 inversions every 60 seconds. I get good separation at both ends of the tonal scale and greater contrast latitude in the darkroom.

    My $.02

  9. #29

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    Must be carefull with minimums. Consider a roll of beach, snow,
    or ..., and that with night clubs, deep dark forests, or ... . You've
    maybe loaded down the developer with one while you've developer
    to spare with the other.

    I've given the matter some thought and save for tailoring the
    dilution for each roll that comes along the only other way which
    will give consitant results regardless of the film's exposure is
    the "swamp it" approach.

    I'm working with the Ansco/Beers A formula for both film and
    paper. As a compensating developer for film, the temtation is
    to use very little. I may up solution volume to 1 liter, that way
    maintaining a surplus of agent while still being very dilute.

    Perhaps that is what you have in mind. Rodinal, Beutler, FX-1,
    and Ansco/Beers A as a film develper are all high active, low
    sulfite, compensating developers. Dan

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by jcausey
    I love Pan F+ in Rodinal. I haven't even tried it in other developers yet.
    You don't need to
    Just go on souping it in Hot Rod.

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