Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 76,285   Posts: 1,681,159   Online: 699
      
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 57
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    195

    Very grainy FP-4

    I developed a roll of 35mm FP-4 a while back, and yesterday I made some 10x15cm prints from the negatives, and it struck me that the results were very grainy.

    Here's a scan of one of the prints, and the grain is observable without a loupe. I realise that 35mm is grainy, but I didn't realise that a ASA125 film would be *this* grainy. Maybe with Rodinal, but this is in HC-110B, which I thought had at least some solvent action going on to reduce grain slightly.

    Have I done something wrong somewhere, or is FP-4 supposed to be this grainy? Maybe I've been spoilt by 120 and 4x5.
    "Art is is a picture of some dude I never met smoking under a lamppost at 6400 ISO and in BW."

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    5,299
    Please try Formapan 400, HP5+ or Trix next...

  3. #3
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,043
    Images
    46
    I think you have been spoiled by larger negatives. I like the grain in that photo, lends a certain quality that smacks of "this is real" just like life.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum Aevum

    “What is a master but a master student? And if that's true, then there's a responsibility on you to keep getting better and to explore avenues of your profession.”ť
    -Neal Peart-

  4. #4
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,248
    Images
    348
    I don't think FP4 should be that grainy and certainly not from that size of print. May I ask have you cropped into the image when enlarging? Perhaps you should also look at your development process in terms of time/temperature and dilution.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  5. #5
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Francisco area (Albany, California)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,328
    Images
    6
    Did you underexpose perhaps? That bright background would "fool" any in-camera meter unless you compensated for the bright background or used a spot meter.
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    I don't think FP4 should be that grainy and certainly not from that size of print. May I ask have you cropped into the image when enlarging? Perhaps you should also look at your development process in terms of time/temperature and dilution.
    Nope, no cropping to speak of. I figured that development could be the issue, but I was following recommendations (9 minutes at 20C). I exposed the film at EI 100 though, rather than 125, maybe I should have reduced my development time?

    Something that also struck me is that the roll has been lying around in my fridge for about a year, expiry date is March 2016, but could the long cold storage been affecting it somehow?

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Sintchak (rich815) View Post
    Did you underexpose perhaps? That bright background would "fool" any in-camera meter unless you compensated for the bright background or used a spot meter.
    Nope, the only fault I can find with the negatives (apart from the grain) is that they're a bit contrasty, but density is good (I used a flash meter to meter the background and subject independently).
    "Art is is a picture of some dude I never met smoking under a lamppost at 6400 ISO and in BW."

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    40
    The grain should not be an issue on such a small print. You mention the negative is contrasty. This suggests some overdevelopment. Also check the film surface it is possible some type of micro-reticulation is happening which can look like bad grain. Cold storage should not affect the film. Exposing at EI 100 will only improve shadow detail by 1/3 stop. Developing time controls contrast, exposure controls shadows + highlights.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,898
    Images
    98
    Your scan settings or post-processing may accentuate grain too, but that's really a Hybridphoto topic.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    195
    Quote Originally Posted by bdial View Post
    Your scan settings or post-processing may accentuate grain too, but that's really a Hybridphoto topic.
    You see the same effect when looking at the print in daylight as well, so it's sure to be the film.
    "Art is is a picture of some dude I never met smoking under a lamppost at 6400 ISO and in BW."

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,899
    HC-110 should produce grain very similar to that of D-76/ID-11. However grain is dependent on such things as correct exposure and development. Without further information it would be hard to tell.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin