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  1. #11
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Are you sure they are on the emulsion side of the film?

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by cliveh View Post
    Are you sure they are on the emulsion side of the film?
    Absolutely

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Boris011 View Post
    I have heard that some people wipe excessive water from film with their fingers, but I am afraid that it could damage negative.
    Yeah, don't do that. Better to use photo flo and the water will run off it.

    But I think you should start by using demineralised water in the whole process.

    Hopefully that will clear most of the spots. If not, try fresh bottles of chem.

    The bathroom is usually the least dysty room. Dust usually turns up as long narrow shapes rather than than the splodges you have .

  4. #14
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    I had this. It was crap in my water supply. installed a 10" filter housing with 5 micron filter as supplied for fish ponds and problem went away.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr rusty View Post
    I had this. It was crap in my water supply. installed a 10" filter housing with 5 micron filter as supplied for fish ponds and problem went away.
    +1 I had rust particles coming from city water supply which was solved with a 5 micron filter. For a while I could not figure out what was going on, but once I left film washing in running water for more than an hour and a half (a trip to a store took a bit long), and the film was so bad, it was obvious that it's the water.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    Yeah, don't do that. Better to use photo flo and the water will run off it.

    But I think you should start by using demineralised water in the whole process.

    Hopefully that will clear most of the spots. If not, try fresh bottles of chem.

    The bathroom is usually the least dysty room. Dust usually turns up as long narrow shapes rather than than the splodges you have .
    If you want to wipe then a store bought film squeegee is best option but it needs to be cleaned before each use.
    If your water is hard or full of solid bits boiling a kettle, cooling, filtering and adding a drip of surfacant is necessary, but you can reuse this as a final rinse several times. Or filter before each use.
    The advantage of a squeegee is the film will dry off and harden in fraction of time reducing dust exposure. They don't scratch even with softer film.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaf-Photo View Post
    Yeah, don't do that. Better to use photo flo and the water will run off it.

    But I think you should start by using demineralised water in the whole process.
    This is absolutely not necessary unless you can't find another clean water source, and in case of film washing it is actually detrimental. As scientific studies have found, washing film with distilled water is far less effective than regular tap water. The final rinse with distilled water is only necessary to prevent drying marks on your film, and yes, I highly recommend this.
    Trying to be the best of whatever I am, even if what I am is no good.

  8. #18
    Jaf-Photo's Avatar
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    Well, the suspicion is that the OP's spots come from the 20 minute wash in running tap water.

    To check if this is correct the best way is to use the demineralised water that he already has in the whole process.

    If this does solve the problem, then he can think about a permanent solution, either a filter or buying purified water.

  9. #19

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    Thank you for your kind answers.
    I'm gonna try using demineralised water through the whole process of film development. I hope it's just a water problem.
    This weekend I'm planning to shoot some Ilford Delta 100 in 35mm, and I'm gonna soup it in ID11 1+1.
    I'll update with results here later next week.

    Thanks again.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Boris011 View Post
    I'm gonna try using demineralised water through the whole process of film development.
    Total overkill, unless you live in country with real dirty water supply. I don't think so.
    I use for everything tap water; developing, fixing, washing. I have no idea where from in tap water such a large, hard particles could be found, but I think it is a bad idea to wash the film in running tap water. primarily as it is too cold and cold water doesn't wash effectively, but prolonged wetting of the film makes emulsion swollen and soft. This particular particles may came from the air. Swollen emulsion may also "rearrange" structure of the grain enough to loose something on sharpness. Modern films have very thin emulsion, even TX is not the same like in 50ties. This films do not need such a long washing time, 10 - 12 min is sufficient, but water better be of 20 -22 C. Instead of using tap for running water make yourself simple cascade for 3 liters of the water, control the flow, that this 3 liters will flow for 12-14 min and you will be in total control. Make sure, that you dry the film in relatively clean air.

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