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  1. #1
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    Film processing with green safelight

    Over the weekend, I tried for the first time process film through inspection. I have to say that it's pretty cool. I've been reading up on it on the internet and I got a used safelight with a dark green filter with a 15 watt bulb for $12. I still have a lot to learn, but my negs are quite usable. I processed some 5x7 Arista EDU 400 and it didn't get fogged from the safelight. Do any of APGUers use this method of film processing?
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  2. #2
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mainecoonmaniac View Post
    Over the weekend, I tried for the first time process film through inspection. I have to say that it's pretty cool. I've been reading up on it on the internet and I got a used safelight with a dark green filter with a 15 watt bulb for $12. I still have a lot to learn, but my negs are quite usable. I processed some 5x7 Arista EDU 400 and it didn't get fogged from the safelight. Do any of APGUers use this method of film processing?
    I do. I use a 7.5 watt bulb. Gives me a little more time to look. I use HP5+
    Jim

  3. #3
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    1/2 the wattage

    Quote Originally Posted by c6h6o3 View Post
    I do. I use a 7.5 watt bulb. Gives me a little more time to look. I use HP5+
    2x the fun!
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

  4. #4
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I have one, but never use it. I've thought about using it, but I don't develop in trays.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  5. #5
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    I thought that inspection developing by green light was only for the old more ortho films. Panchromatic films will 'see' the green light.
    Am I wrong? I've never tried it.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  6. #6

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    A check for a few seconds, more than 2/3 of the way through the development, is apparently survivable for pan films due to a reduction in sensitivity during development (sensitising dyes washed out? shielding by developed silver? dunno). I haven't personally tried development of panchromatic film by inspection, only ortho sheets long ago, but many people have used the technique so it is not fictional. Just be sure to realise that it doesn't mean you have the safelight sitting next to the dev-tray, and also that the inspection time really is just a few seconds.

    It would be interesting to hear from a user of this technique, precisely how they use the technique with current materials and at what point (in a test-to-destruction rather than normal work hopefully) they see fogging on the film.

  7. #7
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsdunek View Post
    I thought that inspection developing by green light was only for the old more ortho films. Panchromatic films will 'see' the green light.
    Am I wrong? I've never tried it.
    Yes, you are wrong, the spectral sensitivity for panchromatic film dips in the green region. Exposure = intensity X time, so as long as your green safe light is not too close and you don't have it on for too long, it is a workable method.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #8
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I have a dark green safe light, but I could not out how to develop by inspection with a metal tank or a Jobo processor.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  9. #9
    cliveh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirius Glass View Post
    I have a dark green safe light, but I could not out how to develop by inspection with a metal tank or a Jobo processor.
    In that instance you would need to take the spiral out the tank during development and peel back enough film to view the last frame from the emulsion side on the spiral.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  10. #10
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    I heard of this method over 20 years ago working as a student assistant in a university. My former boss and long time friend told me that his retired colleague used develop by inspection. Sam, my friend told me that it fogs the film and I never explored this method until this weekend. I have to tell everyone that it does work, but I'll have to process film this method more often get get better at it. Being an amateur cook, it like baking a cake and towards the end when the cake is close to done, I inspect the cake with a toothpick to see if it's done. Just time and temperature will get you close with both, but inspecting gets me closer to the results I want. I only turn on the safe light a few seconds at a time.
    "Photography, like surfing, is an infinite process, a constantly evolving exploration of life."
    Aaron Chang

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