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  1. #1

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    T-MAX 100 camera expose setting

    Hello.
    is anyone can give an advice,
    how can i set the camera setting expose for T-MAX 100.
    i had an experience that the contrast was usually very strong.

    thanks in advance.
    sha

  2. #2
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    If you are developing yourself, perhaps you can tell us what speed you rated the Tmax at and what developer, dilution, time & temperature and agitation method you used?

    Contrast is generally a function of development rather than film exposure. Having said that, over-exposed film will have a higher contrast for a given development time.

    Make a contact print on grade 2 paper for the max-black time - that should show where the problem lies. Try setting film speed to ISO 64 and reduce development by 15% and see if you get an improvement.

    Cheers, Bob.

  3. #3

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    64 seems like a good starting point to me.

    ASA 64 seems to me to also be a good starting point. While 100Tmax is certainly capable of producing strong contrasts it more noticable characteristic is its responsiveness to development changes...a boon to careful worker who is prepared to use it to advantage....the bane of those that expect it will tolerate inexactness as well as say Tri-X,

  4. #4
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob F.
    ...Contrast is generally a function of development rather than film exposure. Having said that, over-exposed film will have a higher contrast for a given development time...
    Contrast is a function of development (and lighting, etc.,) but overexposure leads to reduced contrast, not higher contrast for a given development time. The only variable of the 4 of under- or overexposure and under- or overdevelopment that increases contrast is overdevelopment. The other three variables reduce contrast, other things being equal.

    As shadows gain too much exposure and the delicate highlights move further up the tonal scale with overexposure, contrast is reduced since the negative now does not produce a black tone where it should. The scale becomes very dark gray through white instead of black through white, and this is effectively a reduction in contrast in the final image.

    Joe

  5. #5
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smieglitz
    <snip>

    As shadows gain too much exposure and the delicate highlights move further up the tonal scale with overexposure, contrast is reduced since the negative now does not produce a black tone where it should. The scale becomes very dark gray through white instead of black through white, and this is effectively a reduction in contrast in the final image.

    Joe
    Good point: I knew underexposure reduced contrast and assumed, without stopping to think about it, that overexpose would do the opposite...

    Cheers, Bob.

  6. #6
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    But underexposure normally increases contrast, mainly because you loose shadow detail.

    Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  7. #7
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I like EI50 for Tmax.

    I have used Tmax at one stop overexposure, EI50, and then developed in Rodinal at 1+75 for about 10 minutes at 68*F. Negatives are definitely not contrasty, but display a wonderful tonal range.

    Hope that helps,

    - Thom

    Quote Originally Posted by shampoo
    Hello.
    is anyone can give an advice,
    how can i set the camera setting expose for T-MAX 100.
    i had an experience that the contrast was usually very strong.

    thanks in advance.
    sha
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #8
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huggyviking
    But underexposure normally increases contrast, mainly because you loose shadow detail.

    Thom
    Not in my experience - possibly if you underexposed by very many stops. My image of Salisbury Cathedral in the gallery is badly underexposed (about 3 or 4 stops) - shadow detail is there but very thin, and even printed at grade 5 is still too soft. Other images on the same roll with correct exposure fit grade 2 - 3 easily.

    Cheers, Bob.

  9. #9
    smieglitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by huggyviking
    But underexposure normally increases contrast, mainly because you loose shadow detail.

    Thom
    But at the same time that shadow detail is lost highlights become darker and things that should be white or threshold gray slide down the scale becoming too dark. Now the scale is from black from the thin shadows to light gray instead of white in the high values which is an overall reduction in contrast.

    The effects of over- and underexposure on contrast are readily apparent on a proper proof sheet. There is no black on an overexposed frame and no white on an underexposed frame. The full scale from black to white is not present in either case so contrast is less than normal.

    Again, overdevelopment is the only one of the 4 variables that will increase contrast.

    Joe

  10. #10
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    You gentlemen are obviously a step ahead of me. I stand corrected, and thank you for educating me. To me, underexposure usually involves more development time, and that got me mixed up.

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

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