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  1. #1

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    B&W developing technical details

    Hello Everyone!

    I am a newbie to analogue photography and am looking for some advice.

    I should like to know if there is a book or books I could obtain on the technical process of B&W developing as I am going to mix my own formulas.

    Already have several "cookbooks" with recipes.

    I have collected all the chemicals required and the darkroom equipment.

    Specifically I would like to learn:

    1. What each of the ingredients do the chemical reactions involved.

    2. The effects of developing time and agitation on the finished negative.

    3. The effect of temperature.

    4. Pushing the film.

    I realize that experimentation is essential in the learning process and am not asking for advice on the above as such.

    Book recommendations would give me a place to start my own learning and a basis for my experiments.

    Thanks for you time.

  2. #2
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Welcome to APUG. When you say you are going to mix your own formulas, do you mean that you will try to create new formulas? The best place to start is with some tried and proven recipes such as D76. You can then start playing around with the ingredients.

    "The Film Developing Cookbook" by Anchell and Troop is a great place to start.

    A developer contains a developing agent, accelerators, restrainers, buffers in various combinations. You will eventually develop an understanding of how these all work together.

    Developing time, agitation and temperature all increase the amount of development as they increase.

    The best place to start is with a simple formula and start making variations from there.

  3. #3
    chriscrawfordphoto's Avatar
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    Kevin's recommendation of The Film Developing Cookbook is spot on. Its the best book I have seen about developers and how they work.

    I would not try designing developers; you're just beginning with film, and already wanting to do something that even the most technically advanced photographers are rarely qualified to do.
    Chris Crawford
    Fine Art Photography of Indiana and other places no one else photographs.

    http://www.chriscrawfordphoto.com

    My Tested Developing Times with the films and developers I use

    Become a fan of my work on Facebook

    Fort Wayne, Indiana

  4. #4
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Hmm....

    Seems like "The Film Developing Cookbook" second edition is very different from the first edition, as it seem to place more focus on the development process these days and not too much on the chemistry behind developers and fixers.
    http://www.amazon.com/Film-Developin.../dp/0240802772

    To the OP: You should try and get hold of the first edition of this book, if Amazon doesn't have it, try finding it as an ebook or trough eBay.

    On a personal level, I feel that the second edition is more to my liking, so I put that one on my wish-list ^^
    Last edited by Helinophoto; 08-13-2014 at 02:43 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  5. #5

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    Hello,

    Thanks for the replies and good advice.

    I am not intending to design my own developers just use the recipes in the book, which I have.

    What I was getting at was my developing an in depth knowledge to clear some of the information overload.

    I guess that it all comes down to trying things out and good record keeping.

    Thanks,

  6. #6
    Oxleyroad's Avatar
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    Welcome, and I can't recommend good note taking highly enough.
    Cheers - Andy C
    ---------------------

    16mm Cine, 35mm, 120, 5x4 & 7x5.

  7. #7
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Cookbook is fun to read, but I am afraid you may not get anything better compare to existing and well proven forumlas(product) available in the market.

    D76 1+1: Nothing can go wrong with this formula and it is cheap.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

  8. #8

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    On the chemistry of photography, I started with "The Fundamentals of Photography" by CEK Mees. My edition is from 1935 but the essentials are still accurate.
    Also "Photographic Processing Chemistry" by LFA Mason.
    And the one the real gurus recommend is Grant Haist's 2-volume "Modern Photographic Processing".

    You can usually pick up either of the first two for a small sum from 2nd hand booksellers, but the Haist costs an arm and leg.

    Mason is clear but technical and unless you have an excellent grasp of chemistry 70% of it will be pretty opaque. I don't, but I found it very helpful all the same.

    I suspect Haist will be similarly technical.

  9. #9

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    Don't worry about developers on a 16x20 print blind test you won't be able to tell much difference. The film choice is the significant one.

    We have wars about Hp5+ versus Trix...

    D76 was the cheapest developer.

    ID68 (Microphen) is marginally less toxic and better cause a more modern chemical substituted

    Wear rubber or nitrile gloves at least.

    http://www.ilfordphoto.com/aboutus/page.asp?n=26

    gory details

    http://www.lostlabours.co.uk/photogr...6_variants.htm

  10. #10
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    http://www.udmercy.edu/crna/agm/phenvitc.htm

    ...about the storage life of photographic developers.
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

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