Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,750   Posts: 1,483,830   Online: 1090
      
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Moscow, Russia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    768
    Images
    36

    Ikonogene - anyone messed with it? :)

    Hello friends,

    yesterday I did some cleanup in our cabinets with chemistry, so there I found a 2 kg old bottle of Ikonogene - 1-amino-2-naphtol-4-sulfonic acid. Judging by its name, it has something to do with the photography - also I know Kodak once made some developers on its base. In our science, biochemistry, this compound is used as an universal reducing agent (!!) in mixtures with sodium sulfite (!) and potassium metabisulfite (!), so the reducing mix is almost like a developer by itself. I remember myself quantifying the nucleic phosphorus by a molybden blue formation with Ikonogene. Maybe I can use it somehow to develop my poor films, eh? My search in the Internet gave no results - perhaps this developing compound has been forgotten for ages?

    Regards from Moscow,
    Zhenya

  2. #2
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Try searching for "Eikonogen"...

    Here's a recipe from Vogel (1904):

    A)
    100 g sodium sulfite crystals
    1500 ml distilled water
    8 drops concentrated sulfuric acid
    25 g Eikonogen

    B)
    150 g crystallline sodiun carbonate, OR 100 g potasium carbonate
    1000 ml disitlled water

    For use mix 3 parts A), 1 part B), add some drops 10% potassium bromide solution.

    Another one, from "Teknisk Ukeblad", 1891:


    Vand...................................... 100 vægtsdele (Water 100 parts)

    Eikonogen................................. 2 - (Eikonogen 2 parts)

    Kaliumkarbonat........................ 8 - (potassium carbonate 8 parts)

    Natriumsulfit.............................. 4 - (sodium sulfite 4 parts)
    Last edited by Ole; 03-03-2005 at 01:43 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Another old recipe added
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    West Midlands, UK, and Turkey
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,965
    Images
    148
    My 1937 edition of L P Clerc - Photography Theoty and Practice, lists Eikonogen as a developing agent of once great popularity, after its discovery byMeldova in 1881, however saying it went out of use with the introduction of Metol. Obviously Metol, discovered 10 years later must have had advantages.

    Eikogen is: 1-amino-2-hydroxy napathalene-6-sulphonic acid

  4. #4
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,280
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Incidentally Eikonogen was the first photography-related product from AGFA!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Moscow, Russia
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    768
    Images
    36
    Thanks friends,
    I think the Eikonogen was way more expensive to make compared with Metol. It's a naphtalene-related product, so it's more expensive than benzene-derived stuff due to higher price of aromatic-rich oil. Also it takes more synthesis steps - hydroxylation, amination, sulfonation etc. So maybe Eikonogen has some advantages over Metol, but it was discontinued because of its price I will try how it works, maybe it's a disaster, or maybe a candy? The Teknisk Ukeblad should help, I found the full version on a runeberg.org - it's not too difficult to understand given I know some Deutsch

    Regards from Russia,
    Zhenya



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin