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  1. #1

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    Quick question on fixing

    Should I rinse between stop-bath and fixing?
    I've only done a few rolls so far and I've been dumping the fixer in straight after pouring out the Stop-bath. I ask because I've just started reusing my Rapid-fixer and having used one liter of fixer to do two 120 rolls I find the fixer is starting to turn greenish.
    Is this ok?

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

  2. #2

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    You do not need to rinse between stop bath (assuming standard acetic or citric acid) and fixer unless you happen to be using a home-mix alkaline fixer that is not well buffered. There are no commercially packaged rapid fixers (acidic or alkaline) I know of which would have this problem.

    If you are using any of Kodak or Ilford's packaged fixers they work fine directly after a stop bath. Be sure to follow the stop bath manufacturer's directions for mixing/dilution so that you don't mistakenly end up with a working solution that is too acidic etc.

    Some light colouring in the fixer solution is not a problem in and of itself as this can come from different sources (dyes in the film etc.). However more pronounced and/or darker colours could possibly signal something isn't right.

    Do not overuse fixer working solutions and it is best not to keep used solutions for too long. Follow the manufacturer's indications with respect to capacity. When in doubt, better to be conservative than risk the problems related to using exhausted fixer.

  3. #3
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JammyB View Post
    Should I rinse between stop-bath and fixing?
    I've only done a few rolls so far and I've been dumping the fixer in straight after pouring out the Stop-bath. I ask because I've just started reusing my Rapid-fixer and having used one liter of fixer to do two 120 rolls I find the fixer is starting to turn greenish.
    Is this ok?

    Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk
    No, there s no need to do that,but, consider two-bath fixingto make sure the last fix is always fresh fix.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  4. #4

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    A very good question, one that I also used to wonder about. The advice you got is correct, it's perfectly OK to pour the fixer in right after the stop bath, and it's also OK to pour the spent fixer back into your big bottle, as most people do. My fixer (Kodak Rapid) lasts longer than I had figured that it would. It pays to do a simple clip test if you have any question on that.

    http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subsc...xhaustion.html

  5. #5
    MattKing's Avatar
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    The question is good, but the thread title could be "fixed".

    Something like: "Should their be a rinse between stop bath and fix?"
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    A very good question, one that I also used to wonder about. The advice you got is correct, it's perfectly OK to pour the fixer in right after the stop bath, and it's also OK to pour the spent fixer back into your big bottle, as most people do. My fixer (Kodak Rapid) lasts longer than I had figured that it would. It pays to do a simple clip test if you have any question on that.

    http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subsc...xhaustion.html
    Thanks for the link Momus. I'll put that in to practice.

  7. #7
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    What they all said, you can pour the fixer in after the stop bath has been emptied.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #8
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    As an aside, stop bath stops development because it's acidic. Rapid fixer is also quite acidic and will also stop development very rapidly, so why bother with a stop bath?

    IMHO the reason is to preserve your fixer from carryover of alkaline crap from the developer. The stop bath is not just stopping the development, it's a matter of dropping the pH of all the stuff soaked into the emulsion so as to not stress the buffering agents in the fixer. This is not so important with film (a water stop bath is fine there, it just washes the developer off) but is very important with FB paper.

    If you develop some FB paper, it will soak up a huge quantity of developer like a sponge and then if you dump it in your fixer, it is like chucking 50mL of developer into the fix. The fix will survive that once or twice but not in the long term, and you will not get the rated capacity of the fixer if you pollute it with so much developer. The stop bath exists to wash the developer out and bring its pH down to closer to what the fix needs, so when you carry over a bunch of stop bath into the fixer, it doesn't really do much damage.

  9. #9

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    Is it better then to use a stop bath rather than a water bath if you have hard water? This is what I assumed. My water comes from a chalk aquifer (yorkshire wolds).

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  10. #10

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    Don't like better...

    I have chalk water I live between two chalk rivers think the planet has only 200.

    I temper to a few degrees F and use two water rinses of about 7/8 of a tank full with full inversion for 30 seconds each in place of an acid stop

    There is a gelatine shock and expansion on the change in pH between the high pH developer (borax) and acid stop.

    A non prehardened emulsion may be damaged it is soft compared with Ilford or Kodak.

    I then use a plain hypo fix.

    Rinse
    hypo clear
    Ilford three rinse
    surfant
    squeegee cause I get drying marks...
    Last edited by Xmas; 08-28-2014 at 05:30 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: clarity

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