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  1. #1

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    Reticulating film.

    Love to reticulate some old stock t-max100. I,ve seen prints made with negs.that have been treated with this process but am a bit vague about the actual steps involved.
    I might add that I use plastic reels.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    VoidoidRamone's Avatar
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    I've never actually done this, but I have friends that have. From my understanding, you develop as normal then stop the film in a really hot stop bath (like 100deg or so). And I think I heard that you can also use a hot fixer aswell (someone please correct me if I'm wrong).
    -Grant

  3. #3

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    You might be better off reticulating just blank film and then printing that on top of the negative you already have. This way you can print the picture non-reticulated if you like. Either way, reticulation is caused by extreme tempature change (I'd say 20 or so degrees F). I accidently reticulated sme film last year. After fully developing and washing the film, I accidently used very hot photo flo which did the trick. Plastic reels shouldnt make any difference.

  4. #4
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    Devlop the film on the warm side (72f) after dev rinse with hot water (100f) followed by ice water followed by fix etc...

    *

  5. #5
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I was B&W printer at a big custom lab. One day the guy that develops the film comes in with the most reticulated roll of film that I have ever seen. Not just grain clumping but actual gelatin crinkling. Apparently it was the first roll of the morning and he hadn't checked the wash water temperature which was running as hot as a large commercial lab's hot water heater is capable of putting out. I thought that it was very attractive if that was the effect that you were after. I assume that the client decidedly wasn't interested in exploring the world of special effects photography.

    The B&W processing guy gave the film and prints to the client along with a stern warning against leaving his camera in the glove compartment of his car.
    :rolleyes:
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  6. #6

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    Same thing happened to me...my wash water just went blooey one day...actually it was only about 85-90F but that was enuf. The film looks wild. I wouldn't do it again tho.

    stink

  7. #7

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    Thanks one and all.
    Because the bulk roll was a "freebie" I,ll try different ways to shatter the grain while keeping in mind,#1.Take notes. #2.Don,t attempt this with my vacation shots.
    Mike

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Kennedy
    Love to reticulate some old stock t-max100.
    Best done I'd say after processing. Give this a try: soak
    the film for two or three minutes in a solution of high ionic
    strength, perhaps sodium sulfate. After, place the film in
    distilled water at a same warm temperature as the first
    bath. As the water rushes in osmosis will cause a build
    up of pressure in the emulsion. It will swell and distort.

    Dr. M. J. Gudzinowicz has mentioned the method in one of
    his posts at rec.photo.darkroom. T-Max is hard to reticulate
    due to emulsion incorporated hardeners. Dan

  9. #9

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    Here are the steps for reticulation (courtesy of the Great Yellow Father):

    Develop Film Normally.

    Rinse in stop bath 1 minute at 140-150 degrees F.

    Immerse film in cold water (below 40 degrees) for 1 minute.

    Immerse in hot water 180 degress for 1 minute.

    Fix with hardening fixer.

    Wash film 20 minutes.

    Do not use photo flo and do not squeege - the film emulsion is very soft.

    For added effect - freeze the film
    "while a hundred civilizations have prospered (sometimes for centuries) without computers or windmills or even the wheel, none have survived even a few generations without art." David Bayles & Ted Orland Art & Fear

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by kchittenden
    Here are the steps for reticulation (courtesy of the Great Yellow Father)
    THANKS

    I was about to ask how to reticulate and the answer was here in details.

    I am going to do a reticulated film next weekend.

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