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  1. #1
    norm123's Avatar
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    Potassium ferricyanide local bleaching

    Hi all

    Yesterday, I saw a video about a French printer who use bleaching with brush, Q-Tips between 2 baths fixing.

    For me, it looks more accurate than to dodge some areas too dark.

    Did you experiment this?

    Any tips are welcomed.

  2. #2

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    Dodging and bleaching are going to do different things. How for example would you dodge the whites of someone's eyes or bleach a print back to give it a nice contrasty pop? Local bleaching is going to lift and add contrast to highlights and mid-tones. Although dodging can be used for this too, it doesn't quite do the same thing as it reduces print density as opposed to increase contrast. A toothbrush can't go where floss can but they really compliment each other :-)

    I know the video you are talking about. She prints beautifully, her hands do a mesmerizing and symbiotic dance under the light.
    Last edited by Ghostman; 03-17-2015 at 08:04 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  3. #3
    darkosaric's Avatar
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    I use it for some very small places that I want to bleach - like eyes or some parts of clothes. Be careful and make very diluted potassium ferricyanide, easily you can get too light or it can spread on unwanted areas. Best is to practice on one ruined print.

  4. #4
    norm123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghostman View Post
    Dodging and bleaching are going to do different things. How for example would you dodge the whites of someone's eyes or bleach a print back to give it a nice contrasty pop? Local bleaching is going to lift and add contrast to highlights and mid-tones. Although dodging can be used for this too, it doesn't quite do the same thing as it reduces print density as opposed to increase contrast. A toothbrush can't go where floss can but they really compliment each other :-)

    I know the video you are talking about. She prints beautifully, her hands do a mesmerizing and symbiotic dance under the light.
    Yes. That's the video. The prints are beautyful.

  5. #5
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by norm123 View Post
    Hi all

    Yesterday, I saw a video about a French printer who use bleaching with brush, Q-Tips between 2 baths fixing.

    For me, it looks more accurate than to dodge some areas too dark.

    Did you experiment this?

    Any tips are welcomed.
    Yes, sure; works great.brush the ferry over printareas you wish to lighten up like 'liquid light but don't forget to fix and wash afterwards.works great for eyes,clouds and other highlight needed a little extra light.I had limited success with increasing shadow detail.I think you simply need more film exposure fr that.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  6. #6
    CropDusterMan's Avatar
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    I often used pot. ferri. to open up the whites of the eyes in some of my close head-shots...it took some
    practice to get it from looking too done...I did it during the wash phase using q-tips.
    Common Sense is not so common.

  7. #7
    norm123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by norm123 View Post
    Yes. That's the video. The prints are beautyful.
    I found the link.

    I understand that is good to add a punch in highlight.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qz2dC5MXjSY

    thank you all for tips.

  8. #8

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    Keep in mind that bleach works on areas of lower density first (highligths, mid tones) before it starts affecting dense areas. By the time is starts working on the dense areas, the rest of your print will have disappeared :-)

    What I recommend doing is experimenting with prints that you think you've either under or over-exposed. Make a dilute solution of bleach and stick your print in there. You will see when the various areas of your print begin to become affected. Bleaching like this to varying degrees and then toning in sepia produces wonderful results. Remember that after bleaching you need to fix again.

  9. #9
    K-G
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    Here you can have good use for that huge pile of scrap prints that all printers have but only a few dare to admit. The way to success is spelled PRACTICE . Different sizes of thick watercolour brushes are helpfull besides the Q-tips. Do the bleaching in many small steps and inspect in between. It is very easy to go to far. Good luck !

    Karl-Gustaf
    Karl-Gustaf Hellqvist

    www.heliochroma.com

  10. #10
    M Carter's Avatar
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    Couple things to note:

    Dilute ferri alone will bleach, but the full effect isn't seen until it hits the fix. Some people mix dilute fixer with a bit of ferri, others go back & forth between brushing ferri and splashing fix on the print.

    Ferri reacts with fixer in a way that makes a ferri+fixer solution die in about 10 minutes, something to keep in mind. But for spot bleaching, you may only need an ounce or two of the solution. It's good to find a small heavy jar or something that won't tip over.

    The good thing here is - 100g of ferri will last a long, long time if only used for spot bleaching.

    For spot bleaching, if you have a sheet of glass or a big tray with a flat bottom, you can prop that up in a sink and keep a running hose handy. Some people like the print propped up, others like it flat so the bleach doesn't run. In either case, running water, a squeegie, and a clean cloth are helpful - if the print is wiped and blotted, the bleach won't spread as easily.

    And, as others have mentioned - practice on some scrap prints! It's easy to overdo, it's easy to use too-strong a solution and then see streak-marks where you hose it off.

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