Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 76,276   Posts: 1,681,111   Online: 798
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. #1
    AllanD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Wiltshire,UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    120

    WWII films - what would you guys do?

    Hi all,

    A friend of mine bought this lot at a boot sale (photo below). Some have been exposed and some remain unused. No clues re. provinance, how they have been stored (other than in an old cigar box, in their original tin canisters) or what might be on the exposed films. She does know that they are circa 1941-1946, but I don't know were she got that info from. My friend's main interest is in the actual cartridges. She does not want to use the unexposed films. I have suggested to her that there is a chance that something may be recoverable from those that have been exposed. My questions are:

    1. If I were to have a go at developing these films, what are your suggestions re. the best developer and process? I have on hand D76, PQ universal and the makings of D23 or basic M/Q or P/Q type developers. I also have available some CD3 and CD4, if something more exotic would do the best job. I have two retrainers available; potassium bromide and benzotriazole.

    2. I am presuming that the used films are B&W. Is this correct? Either way, would I be better off processing all of them as B&W?

    3. Do these film canisters come apart easily, or would I be better off trying to pull out the leader? As I said, my friend is mainly interested in the cartridges as an addition to her collection of old cameras.

    I do not have the films on hand, so I cannot say anything more about them than you can see from the attached photo.

    What would you guys do?


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	11071299_959530524065195_7307391285990146198_o.jpg 
Views:	127 
Size:	117.7 KB 
ID:	106127
    Heat or light; it depends on your sensitivity.

  2. #2
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    San Francisco area (Albany, California)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,328
    Images
    6
    -----------------------

    "Well, my photos are actually much better than they look..."

    Richard S.
    Albany, CA (San Francisco bay area)

    My Flickr River of photographs
    http://flickriver.com/photos/rich815...r-interesting/

    My Photography Website
    http://www.lightshadowandtone.com

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,899
    If any of the unexposed films are on nitrate base then discard them. They are a fire hazard.

    Acetate films may have experienced vinegarization. You can tell by the smell. Again discard any unexposed ones as unusable.
    .
    If you decide to develop some of the exposed films then do not use an anti-foggant like benzotriazole or add any additional bromide to a developer.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 03-30-2015 at 04:21 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,620
    Images
    7
    I've had good luck exposing nitrate stock from a similar era and developing it in D23 1:1 with 0.5g/L of KBr. Without the KBr the fog level was too high. Only because I had D23 already made up, it isn't ideal for such old film. D76 stock might be better to give the contrast a kick.

    There are easily found pdfs on handling (or not) nitrate films (e.g. http://www.nationalmediamuseum.org.u...itrateFilm.pdf) , and if you do want to dispose of them then you'll need to contact your local authority because they shouldn't just be thrown into the rubbish for collection with your household stuff.
    Contrary to popular myth it won't spontaneously combust but it is very flammable indeed. If you have a hankering to burn some just to see how it goes up (like a bomb, actually) Don't breath the fumes, by the way - they are hideously toxic.

    I'd guess they're acetate though.

    I'm not sure why Gerald thinks one shouldn't use a restrainer - perhaps he could elaborate?

  5. #5
    cliveh's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,248
    Images
    348
    I would not discard any of them and try and develop each one in turn re advice link given by Richard. Those films may hold several classic images. They are like archaeological finds that need to be carefully excavated (in this case developed) and should be handled and processed with care.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,899
    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    I'm not sure why Gerald thinks one shouldn't use a restrainer - perhaps he could elaborate?
    The latent image on old film has already lost part of its density. You don't want to decrease this any more. Remember that anti-foggants not only decrease fog density but image density too. The same applies for bromide.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 03-30-2015 at 04:30 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,049
    Dear AllanD,

    I cannot see anything that is likely to be nitrate at all but you do have colour, I think they are probably post WWII.

    BUT : The monochrome should absolutely be processed, the simplest way is D76 / ID11 12 minutes is our usual advice. You probably will have nothing but you may have something, regardless its important that you process and check.

    As to the cartridges ( cassettes ) the bottom should come off and be replaceable on the body, if you have difficulty the logic is to get the film leader and remove the film by pulling very,very slowly till it stops, and cutting off directly from the opening aperture ( velvet ).

    I am colour ignorant, but guess some apuggers may be able to offer some solutions ( no pun intended ).

    Simon: ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  8. #8
    darkosaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,542
    Images
    4
    Definitely develop them - pictures that are maybe there can be very interesting and valuable.

  9. #9
    Nodda Duma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    447
    Images
    12
    You may want to consider using these guys:

    http://www.filmrescue.com/old-still-film-developing/

  10. #10
    AllanD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Wiltshire,UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    120
    Thanks for the replies and encouragement everyone. I will not be rushing into this and will do more research when I receive the films. Honestly, it never occurred to me that any of the films could be nitrate, but I will warn my friend. Of course, I will post my results if, and when, I give it a go.
    Heat or light; it depends on your sensitivity.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin