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  1. #1
    f/16's Avatar
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    How long does film need to hang to dry?

    I developed my first 2 rolls and they've been hanging in the shower for about 2 hours. About how long before I can take them down?
    Bill

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  2. #2
    APUGuser19's Avatar
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    Tomorrow.

  3. #3
    Pioneer's Avatar
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    I usually wait for a day but sometimes I do develop in the morning and then scan in the evening. As an example, today I developed 3 rolls of TriX 120 roll film about 9 this morning. I just finished scanning them this evening.

    EDIT - It is probably worth mentioning that the humidity today was 31% and indoor temp around 68F. If your humidity is higher then you may find it necessary to wait longer.
    Dan

    The simplest tools can be the hardest to master.

  4. #4

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    I wait till I cant see any sign of moisture. Usually what 19 said ^^
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

  5. #5
    f/16's Avatar
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    The humidity here is usually 60-95% depending on what time of day it is. The hygrometer in the house usually says 55-60%.
    Bill

    Pentax 645, Pentax ME Super
    Kiev 4,
    Praktica LB,
    Minolta SRT 102, SRT 202
    Canon A1, TX
    many Nikons-F2 eye level F2AS N90s, F4E, N2000, N6000, N6006, Nikomat FTN, N5005

  6. #6

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    Less time than it takes for glossy enamel paint to cure but more time than it takes water to boil.

  7. #7

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    Dear f/16,


    What the others say is spot on. However, in times of speedy processing I have found 1 hour in the shower, plus a squeegee (controversial) to be good for newspaper work. Although, most cities that still would use a darkroom would have a film drier. Anyway, for my work it is over night. I only mentioned that incase you needed the film fast, and I would not recommend for several reasons unless you really needed them fast. Have a good day, and congratulations on your first developed films. You will probably find you like the results much better.


    If you don't already know about the "massive dev chart", you should try it as it is very useful. I would have linked the website, but I don't remember the policy on linking websites. Just google "massive dev chart", and it is the first website. Also I would recommend a high quality binder, and negative sleeves to protect them.

  8. #8
    Slixtiesix's Avatar
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    Over night (since I usually develop in the late afternoon or evening). If you develop in the early morning, it should be dry until evening like Pioneer said.

  9. #9

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    Here in San Francisco, were the humidity in my apartment is generally around 50% it takes 3-4 hours.

  10. #10
    IloveTLRs's Avatar
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    I usually have mine dry within an hour or so. I've hung them in direct sunlight a few times, which dries them even faster.
    Those who know, shoot film

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