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  1. #1
    Boris Mirkov's Avatar
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    Neopan 1600 from 1994.

    I am thinking of buying this but having in mind that it is a high sensitivity film with an end date of 1994. I am not sure if it is worth the trouble. Any thoughts on this? And if I do purchase it, what speed shoud I set it to? Maybe some 400?

  2. #2
    Trask's Avatar
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    I do buy and use expired film myself if the emulsion is something I want to try. My criteria is essentially anticipated benefit of using the film vs cost, bearing in mind that the investment could turn out to be worthless. So if you want to try Neopan 1600 and the price seems reasonable, go for it. I've got some original Agfa Superpan 200 (not the recent Superpan) from the mid-1980's that produced fine images; I rated it at ISO 100 and developed it as if it were APX100. 400 might work for your 1600, but obviously you'll have to test.

  3. #3

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    Like Trask, I enjoy experimenting with discontinued film, and it can be surprising how long film can last past its expiry date, unless it has been abused by very bad storage conditions. As said, worth a try if the cost is low and you are happy to experiment, with the knowledge that it could be a waste of time.

    400 ASA might be good as a starting point (I've used very expired Kodak Royal-X with a box speed of 1250 ASA at 250 ASA, with printable results).

  4. #4

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    In a nutshell: I wouldn't waste my money and/or time on it. High speed films are highly susceptible to ambient and cosmic radiation, the effects of which even deepfreezing cannot prevent. The material will be massively fogged by now.

  5. #5
    Colin Corneau's Avatar
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    What mnesmosyne said...there's no guarantees in life, but I guarantee that film will be fogged beyond even Lomo-style appreciation by now.
    "Never criticize someone until you've walked a mile in their shoes. That way, you're a mile away and you've got their shoes."

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  6. #6

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    Right. 1600 ISO film that is 11 years past the expiration date, and I assume no one knows how it has been stored. Bin it.

  7. #7
    Richard Sintchak (rich815)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mnemosyne View Post
    In a nutshell: I wouldn't waste my money and/or time on it. High speed films are highly susceptible to ambient and cosmic radiation, the effects of which even deepfreezing cannot prevent. The material will be massively fogged by now.
    Agree. I shoot lots of expired film. Tried expired high speed and will never again.
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  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by momus View Post
    Right. 1600 ISO film that is 11 years past the expiration date, and I assume no one knows how it has been stored. Bin it.
    Actually 21 years.

    If it were "only" 11 years, I'd be a bit more confident to give it a try.

  9. #9

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    If Neopan 1600's real speed is about 650, as I have seen stated then this is only a half stop faster than 400 film and while even 400 21 year old film is a long way out of date, I wonder if a real 650 film as Neopan is alleged to be is so far past its use-by-date to render it useless?

    pentaxuser

  10. #10
    Trask's Avatar
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    OK, so it's high speed, but the OP is willing to live with a reduced ASA. Older films can work just fine -- here are two on Agfa SuperPan 200 expiration July 1984 as I mentioned above, shot in a Leica III with a Topcor LTM lens, developed in ID-11 just six months ago. I fully understand that recently manufactured film does not present some of the difficulties you may/may encounter with older film, but if the investment is minimal why not give it a try if it turns you one? I read some of the other comments here as being a bit dogmatic -- you shouldn't do it, as if doing so is in violation of some inviolable rule. Sometimes you've got to let your backbone slip, as long as you understand the financial or photographic risks you're running.

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