Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 76,311   Posts: 1,681,874   Online: 783
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2

    Overshooting Film Sensitivity( ASA) of Kodak 5222 B&W stock

    Hi,

    I am studying in a Film School. We learn cinematography through B&W. We use Kodak 5222 stock. Kodak quotes, 250 as the ASA for that stock. But when we exposed for that rating, it was coming a stop and a half over(In comparison with 11th step mid of a sensitometer strip) in our lab. It implies, it has to be rated more than 500 to get it normal. How this can be possible ? If anyone could help in understanding the problem and solving it, it would be great

  2. #2
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,229
    Images
    63
    Welcome to APUG!

    I would first look at the meter you are using, as well as the metering technique.

    Then I would check the shutters and apertures on the cameras.

    Then I would check the darkroom thermometer.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mundelein, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,261
    Images
    1
    When I shoot 5222 as still stock, I rate it at 400. I was also finding that rating at 250 and developing at any of the recommended developer/time formulas found anywhere resulted in overly-dense negatives. When I rate it at 400 and develop to the recommendations, I get much better results. They are still very rich negatives, so I could totally see rating it at even 500 and still getting very good results - keep in mind I am just using my uncalibrated eyes, not a sensitometer or anything.

    Duncan

  4. #4
    APUGuser19's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,224
    Sounds to me like some calibration needs checking, just about everywhere, beginning with the meter and shutter.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Los Alamos, NM
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,118
    ANSI has very strict standards as to how to rate motion picture film speed. I'm sure the film accurately meets those standards. But different equipment and different techniques will give different results. You may have to develop your own empirical EI for each set of equipment and for several shooting scenarios. The rated speed is a reliable starting point. Then you shoot several well metered and well controlled test scenes and look at the results. Then you come up with the effective EI for those conditions. Fussy still photographers have to do the same thing.

  6. #6
    kossi008's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Dresden, Germany
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    52
    The method described by the OP sounds like matching for the mid-tones, but I would need more details.
    However, if my hunch is correct, what you are doing is judging the effect of the development time much more than that of the EI setting.
    For the effective ISO film speed you want to compare a zone I exposure on your film (gray card at minus four stops) to that part of your sensitometer strip that has 0.1 logD.

    In short: my suspicion is that you overdeveloped. But I really would need more details about your process and setup.
    Last edited by kossi008; 05-22-2015 at 03:03 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Photon Counter

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    5,337
    Quote Originally Posted by sathisnsk View Post
    Hi,

    I am studying in a Film School. We learn cinematography through B&W. We use Kodak 5222 stock. Kodak quotes, 250 as the ASA for that stock. But when we exposed for that rating, it was coming a stop and a half over(In comparison with 11th step mid of a sensitometer strip) in our lab. It implies, it has to be rated more than 500 to get it normal. How this can be possible ? If anyone could help in understanding the problem and solving it, it would be great
    I rate it at 320 cause I use speed increase developers like

    Microphen or ID68

    But the ISO or your EI should be done on just detectable image above fog.

    Even if your cine shots are incident dome on nose of actor/actress.

    The D96 soup is not hot like mine and the reference gamma is low...
    I'm just on edge at 320 in contrasty lighting I use 200 EI.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    40
    yes I'm glad someone mentioned the cine processes. From what ive read, 5222 should be quite flat. I would assume that this is to give as linear of a gamma curve as possible for post work.

    Any insight from people shooting and developing in still cameras should be moot should it not? Yes the film processes in all sorts of BW developers but it was designed for a specific process to be used in motion picture.

    Anyways, for what its worth I shot the film at every speed from 200-1600. All with decent results by adjusting process times and techniques.

  9. #9
    darkosaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,544
    Images
    4
    Welcome to APUG .

    When I shoot 5222 - I don't use lightmeter at all. I try to expose it at iso 250, but without lightmeter it goes plus minus 2-3 stops and I get good results in darkroom from this film. Too bad that this film is expensive in Europe.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    2
    Big thanks for the replies! I am quite amazed by the tenderness by you all.

    We used Arri III camera. Shutter angle at 172.8. Frame rate at 24 fps. Carl Zeiss Prime lenses. We set the same settings in the Sekonic Light meter. We used different cameras, lenses and light meters also. Initially when we tested for the latitude using gray card, the lab people notified us that, the grey card was 3 steps upper than the mid point of 21 step sensitometer strip. Though we ensured the sameness of incident and reflected readings of Grey card. From then, we begun to rate above ASA 400.

    If you could help us in the procedure to determine the Film speed, we can do that once and ensure. And when we did fog test also, the base fog was coming around the density 0.34. But we don't have any idea what is the recommended base fog level for the stock (Kodak 5222). Also help us in the procedure of doing latitude test.

    Thanks!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin