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  1. #1

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    Will Microdol give me the same results as Microdol-X?

    I used up the last of my Mic-X, and have this unopened can of Microdol replenisher. Since PE said that it would not work for the Mic-X variety, this might be a good opportunity to try the original version. But will it give me roughly similar results to the X version?

    I understand that the original version had some issues w/ fogging film, which is why they put the silver sequestering agents into the X version (and who knows what else). Hopefully this will not be an issue w/ the Arista EDU Ultra 100 film that I have.
    Last edited by momus; 06-03-2015 at 07:09 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2

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    It is unclear what you intend to do. Do you want to use the replenisher as developer? The chemical balance in a developer and its replenisher is different. A replenisher is usually designed to be more active to offset the decrease in activity of the developer with use.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #3

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    I plan on using the replenisher w/ some yet-to-be bought Microdol. The replenisher is for the non X variety. I was just wondering if the non X version of the developer will give me similar results as the X version. I have no experience using Microdol, only the Microdol-X developer.

  4. #4

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    The results should be very similar. Microdol caused dichroic fog with some films but not all. But that was long ago and emulsions have changed. Give it a try. Are you able to mix your own as I have a formula for microdol from Grant Haist's book. Developer uses 4 ingredients and the replenisher 5. Both use sodium chloride for which pickling salt is the best choice.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #5
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    I've been using plain kosher salt and have been happy. I just use the Microdol-X listings in the development charts, and all seems the same to me.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by APUGuser19 View Post
    I've been using plain kosher salt and have been happy. I just use the Microdol-X listings in the development charts, and all seems the same to me.
    Some salts have an anti-caking additive that causes cloudy solutions. The pickling salt does not.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Some salts have an anti-caking additive that causes cloudy solutions. The pickling salt does not.
    I have found Diamond Crystal kosher salt from the Food Lion to be excellent in this respect. It even states on the label it is prone to caking. I keep my tube of it in the refrigerator. Just to point out, regular salt like Mortons and the other house brands of the same thing are about 50% sand (or something), and are totally unfit for this purpose. I once did a little experiment on Ohaus triple beams (hardly labatory-quality work), and found that regular everyday salt to be so full of crap that it is useless. It even tastes harsh compared to the jewish salt. Since I started mixing my own Microdol, I use the kosher for cooking too. It's less "salty" tasting, or not as sharp, or something I'm not describing well. I also was astounded how much volume of it there was for the weight when I measured it for a quart of Microdol. But I'm mighty happy with the developer. I use it 1:3 just like normal on roll film, and straight for 4x5 in a tray. I bought the sulfite and metol on ebay for peanuts. My film developer is almost free. I can use it like bathwater.

  8. #8

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    Thanks very much. I could mix my own, but for now it's relatively cheap to buy it on the auction sites, especially if I can replenish it. I always use it full strength for the teeny tiny grain on 35mm. I can't find anything that gives me negs like I get when using it w/ several types of film.

    I didn't know that about salt, but it makes sense, as often its taken from the ground, or under it. Wonder what is done differently on the kosher salt? I found this very interesting info on salt here

    http://www.mortonsalt.com/salt-facts...and-processing



 

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