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Thread: Storing X-tol

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    baachitraka's Avatar
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    Storing X-tol

    I have plenty of such glass bottles,

    http://www.ebay.de/itm/Glasflasche-B...item41784ee391

    Can I store x-tol in them? What color does it take when x-tol goes bad?
    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
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    I think glass is your best option yeah. I've tried PET bottles without much success. As far as i know though Xtol doesn't necessarily change color upon turning bad. The best way to check if its still good is to cut off a small strip of film. and throwing it in a bit of xtol. Then checking after a few minutes if it turns dark. Id suggest google'ing on "Xtol sudden death". Its a widely documented issue.

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    Glass bottles are best and of the proper volume so you can keep air space to a minimum. I use 125 ml boston rounds along with 250s and 500s in a decanting scheme to be able to always fill to the top. But water quality is equally important as my Xtol still deteriorates in glass bottles after 3-4 months because of iron content.
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    There are lots of threads about storing X-tol. As stated glass is best, I use a combination of glass and plastic. That is, my working solution is in plastic and I keep the replenishment stock in glass. I mix it with distilled water, and I've gone a year + in storage. I also shift the replenishment stock to smaller bottles as I use it and any air space is flooded with inert gas (nitrogen in my case).
    With X-tol you can't judge whether it's good by color. The bottles you reference should work well.

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    X-tol can lose activity without changing color. Because of this it is always smart to do a snip test. PET bottles are almost as good as glass. As far as aerial oxidation is concerned X-tol is similar to D-76. However when ascorbate developers fail it can be from the Fenton reaction and in this case the choice of bottles is of no importance.
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    baachitraka's Avatar
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    I may mix x-tol powder directly into 5l can of distilled water and pour the mix immediately into 1l glass bottles.

    1l glass bottle which I will mark as Xt will be the developer and remaining 4x1l bottles will be the replenisher with marking R.

    It may be that developer will be full, without air gaps at any time but I wonder about the air gaps in the replenisher.

    I do not have an accordion bottle...
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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    ...
    I do not have an accordion bottle...
    That's ok, you don't want or need one.

    (IMO, and that of many others. They are hard to clean, introduce more space for air and contaminants compared to a standard bottle, and when I tried them they were not effective at excluding air. Maybe they've improved, but hard to clean is still an issue, and they are expensive compared to the alternatives.)

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    I believe most accordion bottles are gas permeable and are a poor choice for storing developing solutions.
    ~ Fred

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    Quote Originally Posted by baachitraka View Post
    It may be that developer will be full, without air gaps at any time but I wonder about the air gaps in the replenisher.

    I do not have an accordion bottle...
    Try winebags. My Xtol is now 23 months old and still works fine although I check it each time with a film leader as already suggested.

    If the wine bag is full before replacing the dispenser then it cannot have any air gaps. The bag collapses under external air pressure as the Xtol is poured out.

    pentaxuser

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    The wine bag needs to be the mylar type, not the transparent plastic type that some boxed wines come in.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

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