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  1. #1
    chuck94022's Avatar
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    Rodinal stand development questions

    I've got a couple of FP4 and HP5 rolls (all 120) that I'd like to try developing using highly dilute Rodinal and stand development. First, is it possible to develop them both at the same time, or do they require radically different times? And speaking of times, what are good starting points for each?

    I also have a 35mm roll of Tri-X, that I exposed slightly below the advertised ISO - I had the camera set at 320. What would be a good time for this roll in Rodinal?

    I'm assuming at least a 1+100 dilution and stand development, but am willing to try higher dilutions, or not, as folks with experience with this might suggest.

    Oh, pretty much all the images on the rolls are landscape, mostly normal contrast shots - nothing really contrasty or flat.

    Thanks!

    -chuck

  2. #2
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    Hi Chuck,
    The Rodinal stand development matter was discussed recently in the thread titled "Efke 25, Rodinal, stand development". Take a look, there might be something there for you.
    Apart that, I have to recommend you to use at least 2,5 -3 ml of concentrate for each film in the tank, whatever the dilution and not to dilute more than 1:400. DO NOT EXCEED DEV TIMES OF 1 HOUR. DICHROIC FOGGING WILL DESTROY YOUR NEGS.
    Diluted Rodinal may work, but there are other soups better suited for stand development than Rodinal, I guess.

  3. #3

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    Chuck, If possible, try some test rolls of each film in stand dev. before you commit to some good stuff.

    Another suggestion I have would be to do both of these films together in D2D. I think this is a great dev for most films. It is the 2nd formula in Anchell's "Darkroom Cookbook'. You'll have to mix it up yourself, but you can certainly do both kinds of film at the same time.

  4. #4
    Dean Williams's Avatar
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    I've done stand development with Tri-X in 35mm and Rodinal 1+300. I agitated gently for the first minute and let it sit for two hours. It worked quite well, with some fog apparent, but in no way were the negs "destroyed". They were easy to print, needing a little more contrast than my normally developed negs and about 50% more exposure in the enlarger. Give it a try with a short roll of unimportant negs and see for your self. There's nothing like first hand experience.
    [COLOR=Sienna][FONT=Arial]Some days are diamonds. Some days a tree crashes through your roof.[/FONT][/COLOR]

  5. #5
    titrisol's Avatar
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    1+200 for 2 hours gives very printable negatives....
    the base+fog level is not bad at all.
    I used more solution than the mininum (400ml or so for 35mm)

    Caution: it worked for me... it may not work for you
    Mama took my APX away.....

  6. #6
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    Dean, I am afraid you didn't understand what I meant with "Dichroic fog". It happens when the film lies in the dev bath for too long a time and it actually is "The nonimage-forming density produced when some of the silver halide in an emulsion is dissolved during the development process, migrates to a different location, and is subsequently reduced. The resulting silver deposit often appears to change color with changes in viewing conditions" (from Focal Press Encyclopedia of Photography).

    I also quote the late Barry Thornton, who suggested to me that what I had on my negatives I developed in Rodinal for 12 hours was Dichroic Fog :

    "I can't really explain the brown colour of the fog. That's the sort of thing that happens with dichroic fog, not a common phenomenon these days."

    And Ted Kaufman that had the same opinion:

    "I believe you experienced dichotic fog with your 12 hour development cycle. That's what that brown color sounds like."

    I believe that negatives that have a brown deposit on them should be considered "destroyed", for even if they may be printable, the image quality and stability is questionable...

  7. #7
    chuck94022's Avatar
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    Well, I did a test roll of HP5 (120) in a 1:200 Rodinal dilution. I also threw in a bunch of other variables - hey, film's cheap, why not? :-) Instead of my usual acid stop, rapid fix, hypo clear, I did a water stop, Photographer's Formulary TF-4 alkaline fix, no clearing agent.

    I souped the HP5 in the Rodinal for a little over two hours. It could have gone longer, but the negatives came out fine. They are certainly very printable. There is grain, but nothing unexpected. There is either a slight fog or more likely I didn't fix as long as I should have - either way, it isn't enough to affect printing. It is only when I put it side by side with another roll that I notice the base of this roll is just slightly darker overall.

    I must say it is an odd feeling to pour in the developer and, after the initial agitation, just walk away and do something else for a couple of hours...

    Thanks all for the kick start.

    -chuck

  8. #8
    Dean Williams's Avatar
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    George, what I don't understand is what your second post has to do with your first.

    First you said: "DO NOT EXCEED DEV TIMES OF 1 HOUR. DICHROIC FOGGING WILL DESTROY YOUR NEGS."

    Then: "I also quote the late Barry Thornton, who suggested to me that what I had on my negatives I developed in Rodinal for 12 hours was Dichroic Fog".

    Twelve hours is a far cry from your first prediction of disaster after just one hour.

    What you get after a two hour stand is a bit more base fog. Easily printed through with a small bump in contrast filtration. The negs not only print fine, but the prints look like what you would expect. Perfectly normal.
    See Chuck's report on the process, just after your last post.
    [COLOR=Sienna][FONT=Arial]Some days are diamonds. Some days a tree crashes through your roof.[/FONT][/COLOR]

  9. #9
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
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    Hey, Dean, OK. You're right and I'm wrong, if you put things this way... In fact, I'm not able to know EXACTLY WHEN dichroic fogging will destroy your negatives. So, to be on the safe side and give a helpful advice I decided to make a point about an 1 hour limit. I might have been too cautious, but I was just trying to help someone avoid ruining his films. As you've seen, it has not prevented chuck from trying a two hour cycle. So, one hour is OK and two hours is OK too. You see, it also depends on the specific conditions under which the test takes place. Another guy at another time could have done the 12 hour cycle and not experience dichroic fogging. But there is always a danger that it may happen, and I think that the photographer should be aware. In the bibliography it is also mentioned that fast films are more prone to it and the type of fixer used also plays some significant role.

  10. #10
    chuck94022's Avatar
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    I must say this process felt like cheating. Rodinal is easy to mix, I didn't have to mix up any stop, the fixer is a quick mix, and no hypo clear to mix. I didn't have to monitor the development and agitate (except the first minute), and time wasn't particularly critical on any of the other steps.

    While it took a long time, I spent almost no time, and ended up with pretty nice negatives at the end. I don't intend to use Rodinal 1:200 for everything, but it's a nice addition to my palatte. Thanks for all the advice.

    -chuck

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