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  1. #1
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    What is Semi-Stand Development?

    I understand regular agitation and think that I understand Stand development but what qualifies as Semi-Stand? I assume that it falls somewhere in between the two but is there a specific methodology to it?
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  2. #2
    Mongo's Avatar
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    I doubt that there's a definitive answer to your question. Semi-stand seems to be a phrase adopted by those of us who do extremely minimal agitation development. The problem is, there's no easy way to quantify the amount of agitation that would differentiate semi-stand from normal or stand development. A couple of cases in point:

    I developed a 120 roll of J&C Pro 100 in Rodinal 1:200 for 90 minutes, with three minutes initial agitation and 1 minute agitation at 30 minutes. (Beautiful negatives, by the way.) Is this stand or semi-stand?

    I developed a 120 roll of Efke 100 in Pyrocat-HD 1:1:100 for fifteen minutes with 10 seconds agitation every 5 minutes. Is this semi-stand, or just a greatly reduced normal agitation?

    It really is a semantic thing, as there are no hard-and-fast rules (at least none that I've ever seen used consistantly) that define the dividing line between these agitation schedules. In my cases I'd refer to the first as "stand" and the second as "normal with reduced agitation", but someone else using the same agitation schemes might call them both "semi-stand". This is why I feel it's best to always include your agitation schedules when you describe development procedures. Even "normal" means 5 sec. every 30 to some and 10 sec. every 60 to others.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  3. #3
    djklmnop's Avatar
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    Developing your negatives while standing up, with one leg.
    Money is not the problem. The problem is, I don't have any.

  4. #4
    c6h6o3's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    I understand regular agitation and think that I understand Stand development but what qualifies as Semi-Stand? I assume that it falls somewhere in between the two but is there a specific methodology to it?
    There is a very comprehensive discussion of this technique on the Azo Forum. Do searches on the phrases "semi-stand" and "minimal agitation". Sandy King lists times and even some density readings, I believe, for many common films. It's done one sheet at a time in tubes.

  5. #5

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    I use a minimal agitation (semi stand) procedure. My procedure is as follows:

    1. Five minute water presoak

    2. Using Pyrocat at 1-1-150 dilution, I agitate in tube for three minutes.

    3. Allow film to stand upright in tube filled with developer for 1/3 of total development time and agitate at ten seconds at each 1/3 of total development time.

    4. Follow with stop bath at three times normal dilution to prevent pinholes in film.

    5. Follow with fix in rapid fixer.

    6. Wash film

    The benefits, as I see them, are enhanced sharpness through edge effects.

  6. #6
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by djklmnop
    Developing your negatives while standing up, with one leg.
    Nah, I'd say it's developing while "perched" on a bar stool with your feet still on the floor.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbarker
    Nah, I'd say it's developing while "perched" on a bar stool with your feet still on the floor.

    closer...it's more like half sitting on a bar stool while leaning on the sink....best place to try this is a bar..after a few drinks...late at night...what were we talking about?


    Donald's response is what I do...
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  8. #8
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    What I've heard as the definition of "semi stand" is that, instead of just leaving the film completely alone for the entire time after the first minute of continuous agitation, you agitate for the first minute, then one cycle (typically 10-15 seconds, say 5 inversions) halfway through the allotted time.

    In my limited experience, this can make the difference between strong and minor edge effects, without affecting compensation much.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    What I've heard as the definition of "semi stand" is that, instead of just leaving the film completely alone for the entire time after the first minute of continuous agitation, you agitate for the first minute, then one cycle (typically 10-15 seconds, say 5 inversions) halfway through the allotted time.

    In my limited experience, this can make the difference between strong and minor edge effects, without affecting compensation much.
    What Donald has stated is how I also describe semi-stand development. I distinguish between various forms of agitation as follows.

    1. Normal agitation. Agitation for the first 1.5 minutes and then thereafter for 10 seconds every 30-60 seconds.

    2. Minimal agitation. Agitation for the first 1.5 minutes and thereafter for ten seconds every two or three minutes.

    3. Extreme Minimal. Agitation for the first 1.5 minutes and thereafter for ten seconds at the beginning of the second, third and final period of development.

    4. Semi-Stand. Agitation for the first 1.5 minutes and thereafter only once for 10 seconds at the half point of total development time.

    5. Stand. Agitation for the first 1.5 minutes of development and thereafter no more.

    These descriptions are my own as previously described on the AZO Forum. They are of course somewhat arbitrary. Feel free to use them, or not use them, as you like.

    Sandy

  10. #10
    panchromatic's Avatar
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    Is there guide lines for stand development? Is the a stand development massive data sheet? I'm interested in testing, and I assume that there would be a large amount of experimenting involved but some basic guidelines would be nice.
    --Ryan

    "The negative is the equivalent of the composer's score, and the print the performance." ~Ansel Adams

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