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  1. #21

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    Used to shoot bands quite a bit. Started with tmax P3200 rated @ 3200, but think I've gotten better negatives using the classic combination of tri-x and Rodinal at either 1600 or 3200 (1600 seems to work so long as you don't care whether you see the drummer or not - but so long as you accept the grain, pushing it 3x gets the shot). Almost exclusively Medium Format now, and the tri-x/rodinal combo works just fine.

    js

  2. #22
    snaggs's Avatar
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    A guy on the rangefinder forum who has done shots all the way up too EI 105,200 (I kid you not!), recommends Tri-X and hates T-MAX 3200.

    I've also done some more reading on hypering, and apparently it can be used to increase the ISO, just not with Hydrogen which the Astrophotographers use, as that also fogs the film slightly whilst improving reciprocity (I know I spelt that wrong, its late).

    I think pure Nitrogen might be the go, in another forum someone said Mercury-Vapour.

    Daniel.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    Saaaaay...

    I wonder what it would take to convince Ilford to coat and cut Delta 3200 in sheet formats? Picture hand holding a Speed or plate camera with available light in a bar or arena...
    I actually asked them about 3 years ago, and they said it would take at least 1/2 million in new machinery. Seemed sincere, not just a blow-off-the-nutcase.

  4. #24
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Not so long ago I heard of a new discovery of an additive to the emulsion that was supposed to drastically increase the ISO by allowing the film to not lose the charges accumilated during exposure. I can't remember the chemical, a common sounding thing, formate maybe? Anyhow I haven't heard any more about this, dropped due to lack of interest or a technical bust?
    Gary Beasley

  5. #25
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Formate doping is in use in the new Vision films from Kodak, as I understand it, but hasn't yet found its way into any B&W material that I know of. I'm seriously doubtful if it ever will, with Kodak no longer spending money on film R&D (the formate doped, aka double electron sensitized color materials were essentially market ready when Kodak made that, IMO, short-sighted decision) and no other company (with the possible exception of Fujifilm) in a position to drop a lot of money developing a new B&W film at this time.

    Vision films are color negative motion picture stocks, which I believe use the alternate (not C-41) color negative process that once gave Seattle Filmworks such a bad name with one-hour processors; as such, they are of very limited utility for still photographers.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  6. #26
    glbeas's Avatar
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    Thanks Donald! I wonder how long it will be before someone figures out how to formate dope an emulsion post production? It'd be cool to take a fine grain film and boost it to 1000 iso and shoot late in the evening handheld.
    Gary Beasley

  7. #27
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    I would guess it's not possible -- at a minimum, it would require soaking the film in something, which would tend to wash out the antihalation and sensitizng dyes, as well as requiring prolonged drying in the dark prior to rerolling. Remotely possible this might be practical for sheet film (if some means is found to reimplant the proper amount/type of sensitzing and antihalation dye), but beyond consideration for roll film.

    The only potential I see is if the dopant can be applied in gaseous form, like forming gas used to hyper films (98% nitrogen, 2% hydrogen), but this seems unlikely (and in any case, formic acid, which would create formates, has a pretty distinct vinegary odor and is likely to absorb into backing paper and such, causing uneven sensitization.

    More likely the doping has to occur at the point when the halide crystals are being formed and/or coaxed to grow in a particular crystal habit (cubic, tabular, or epitaxial instead of the native octohedral), which would make it impossible to apply aftermarket.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  8. #28
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Oh, on a side note -- I happened to see on the Land List while researching a recent junk-store purchase that Polaroid at one point sold a peel-apart CRT recording film rated at EI 20,000, the fastest film every sold commercially. I wonder what its shelf life was before thermal and cosmic ray fogging did it in?
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  9. #29

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    Fastest Film

    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs
    If you've been reading the Rangefinder and Medium format forums, youll know that Im after the ultimate solution for night time candits.

    So what is the fastest film? Which film can be pushed to the highest speeds with results acceptable for 8x10?

    Daniel.
    In Les McLean's excellent book"Creative Black and White Photography" he has taken a photo with 35mm Ilford Delta 3200 called the "New York Kiss". Worth a look if you can get the book. This fits your night time candids exactly. It was taken at 2:00am in a subway station.The print in the book is about 5 x4ins so half your desired size but given that you have 120, I'd have thought that this shot on 120 at 8 x10 would have been very acceptable. He rated it at 25,000 ISO! Yes it's grainy but that's often what expected for night time candids.

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