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  1. #31
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
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    Hi Paul

    Darkroom 2 had photos of , Judy Dater, Frank Gohlke , Emmet Gowin, Charles Harbutt , Lisette Model, Hans Namuth , Doug Prince , Arron Siskind, Neal Slavin, and Cole Weston,
    It was Edited by Jain Kelly,
    Lustrum Press.
    I know the book you are refering to and I had it and now I can't find it.Sorry.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck94022
    You know, here's how it went for me. I was frustrated with every new digital camera I bought - it just didn't work like my film cameras. Press the shutter, wait 3/4 second, or more, finally the shutter triggers. All to a lovely fake shutter sound. Frustrating, and I felt so, well, dumb.
    Just to be a devils advocate:

    This is not true of a digital SLR, which sounds and reacts just like a film camera.

    Even so the output is digicrap. One day when we have 200 Megapixel cams, with 12 bit colour depth I'll go there again. As it is I have a 6 MP Fuji digicam that cost a lot of money 12 months ago, that I give to the kids at the beach :-)

    Graham

  3. #33
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Daniel-

    A lot of the decisions around where your darkroom will be most convenient have to do with your living arrangements.

    I live alone (well, me and the cat), and I rarely eat a meal at home other than breakfast. Although I have a stove/oven and a microwave, I never use them. So my kitchen is my darkroom.

    I put my enlarger (a 4x5 beast) on my kitchen table. I cleared off counter space next to the sink for my trays. I store my film and paper in my refridgerator. (There's a lot more film than food in my house.) I've hung a garment bag in a doorframe to use for film drying. I dry test prints in the microwave. I replaced one of the light fixtures with a red bulb that works perfectly as a safelight. I can dry prints on fiberglass screens that I stretch between two kitchen chairs, using books to weight the ends of the screen. (I can easily stretch the screen to 12 feet if I need to.)

    If I was sharing my living space, I'd move all of this stuff into my laundry room. I'd have to build a vertical drying rack and do some basic carpentry to make a dry-side counter, but I'd use the laundry tubs for all of my wet work. I figure that if I ever need to start sharing my space, I'm about two weeks away from having my darkroom moved completely out of the kitchen. (Storing the film and paper will be the only real issue...I think two refridgerators would be my answer.)

    I guess my point is this: Find a space that you can use, and work with it. People have been using closets as darkrooms for years. Garages too. There are always ways to work these things out. Once you've settled on the space, that will dictate how much you'll have to build, how much vertical space you'll have to use (like stacked trays and stacked drying racks), and pretty much how much you'll have to invest.

    Giving up my kitchen was a no brainer for me. (Heck, I'd already given up my living room floor for equipment storage!) Whatever space you can use, you can make work. Darkrooms just need to be dark. They really don't have to have running water. (They do need electricity; extension cords can be your friends!)

    Good luck with your project. I think the magic of the darkroom far outweighs the digital way (and this comment comes from someone with two film scanners, four printers, two monitors, and a whole bunch of other digicam stuff that sees almost no use any more).

    Be well.
    Dave
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  4. #34
    chuck94022's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gbroadbridge
    Just to be a devils advocate:

    This is not true of a digital SLR, which sounds and reacts just like a film camera.
    Yup, well aware of that, but by the time I got to the "I need a Digital SLR" realization I had already crossed the "I need film" bridge.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck94022
    Yup, well aware of that, but by the time I got to the "I need a Digital SLR" realization I had already crossed the "I need film" bridge.
    For some reason this post made my 21 month old kid laugh.

    He's already a photog and likes me to read the NG each night

    Attached is a photo he took (without help) last week. He held the camera, pointed it at mom, and pressed the shutter himself

  6. #36

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    The New Darkroom Handbook, Joe DeMaio, Roberta Worth, Dennis Curtin. I own that book, it's an awesome book, recommended highly!

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Howell
    The was a really good book written in the early 1980s on darkroom design, the 1st 1/2 of the book was descriptions of working darkrooms of some very famous photographers including Eugene Smith, and Bernice Abbott. It had some really neat plans for large and small darkrooms. Does anyone recall the title and authors?

    Paul

  7. #37

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    When I started darkroom work it was so easy that I couldn't beleive that that was all there was to it. Of course it wasn't: you can be up and running in a few hours then keep on learning more for a lifetime. As they say, anyone who says the camera cannot lie has never worked in a dark room.

    By the way, I so agree with the complaint on the dalay between pressing the shutter and taking a picture with digital cameras (and some auto focus film cameras). On the odd occasion when I use mine I have it on manual focus and exposure and there is still at least half a second's delay before it notices that something is expected of it and goes off. If you want to use flash it can be two or three seconds. So much for the critical moment.

    David.

  8. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs
    It all seems kind of daunting, I love shooting film, and a friend gave me his enlargers etc... I just dont know what to do with them and how to set them up in a normal house.

    Or given I have a large format printer (24"), should I just not bother?

    Daniel.
    Hi 'inky!'
    Last edited by TheFixer; 07-17-2005 at 10:31 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: .

  9. #39
    Calamity Jane's Avatar
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    I was a renter for most of my life; apartments for many years, then houses. Every place I have lived, I have found it possible to set up a temporary darkroom using some black electrical tape, blankets, etc. The vast majority of my temporary darkrooms were bathrooms as they usually have no more than 1 window and 1 door.

    A window can be blanked out by making a wooden frame to fit the window and covering it with a sandwich of black builders plastic with aluminum foil in the middle - 100% light proof and light weight. Some electrical tape or black neoprene weather stripping makes the edges light-tight.

    The key to any temporary darkroom is creativity. Almost any room can be made light tight.

    When I bought my own house, the first room to get set up was the darkroom!

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by snaggs
    Or given I have a large format printer (24"), should I just not bother?
    A miniature film format and a large format printer? Dan

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