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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by ImageMakers
    Great info so far, much appreciated. I checked B&H's website and see multiple choices for Pyro. Can someone recommend which to start with? I will be tray processing first, then setting up a Jobo later.

    Thanks - Jim
    While I have seen some excellent prints from PMK, ABC and Pyrocat. I don't like the first two I mentioned in my work. My preference in the order of preference are 1.Pyrocat, 2. ABC, 3. PMK.

    The thing that would influence my decision, were I in your position, would be the characteristics of these developers as they affect UV transmission for your planned Pt-pd printing. Pyrocat will give you better performance in that situation.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by ImageMakers
    Great info so far, much appreciated. I checked B&H's website and see multiple choices for Pyro. Can someone recommend which to start with? I will be tray processing first, then setting up a Jobo later.

    Thanks - Jim
    Try this - should prove to be easiest for you - especially since you want to do both tray and rotary processing.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by ImageMakers
    Hello- I will be making my first attemp at Azo and Platinum and do have a couple questions.

    1.) Is there a general number of stops to over expose the negative?

    2.) Percentage of over-development, if neccessary?

    3.) Will the negative work with both processes? I understand both prefer a dense negative.

    I will be experimenting with Efke 100 4x5 sheet film and Pyro developer.

    Thanks,
    Jim
    A Donald Miller has pointed out there is no need to "overexpose" for AZO or palladium prints.

    One thing that I will point out is the latest version of grade 2 AZO has a much longer exposure scale that previous versions which makes it difficult to build a negative that will print well with palladium and AZO, so you may wish to calibrate on grade 3 instead and then use a contrastier developer for palladium prints.

    Also the new grade 2 by my tests is about 2 stops slower than the older emulsion versions and there is no guarantee that Kodak won't change something in the future.

    I've used PMK, ABC, and Pyrocat developers with success but Pyrocat is my preferred developer of the three. With a staining developer you have a better chance of making a multi-process negative.

    If you are just starting out with both AZO and palladium I would reccomend that you master AZO first and not worry about the other. Mixing your own developer is the most economical way to go, paying for some else's water isn't economical.

    Good luck,

    Don Bryant

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by donbga
    A Donald Miller has pointed out there is no need to "overexpose" for AZO or palladium prints.

    One thing that I will point out is the latest version of grade 2 AZO has a much longer exposure scale that previous versions which makes it difficult to build a negative that will print well with palladium and AZO, so you may wish to calibrate on grade 3 instead and then use a contrastier developer for palladium prints.

    Also the new grade 2 by my tests is about 2 stops slower than the older emulsion versions and there is no guarantee that Kodak won't change something in the future.

    I've used PMK, ABC, and Pyrocat developers with success but Pyrocat is my preferred developer of the three. With a staining developer you have a better chance of making a multi-process negative.

    If you are just starting out with both AZO and palladium I would reccomend that you master AZO first and not worry about the other. Mixing your own developer is the most economical way to go, paying for some else's water isn't economical.

    Good luck,

    Don Bryant

    I am going to propose something that has not been mentioned before, at least so far as I know. We all are aware of the fact that AZO is *very* sensitive to UV light so why not take advantage of a pyro negatives stain, which functions as a highly actinic filter to UV light, to increase the effective printing contrast of AZO. All we would need to do is substitute the typical R40 floodlight that is used for printing with AZO with a bulb that puts out a lot of UV light. Given the fact that AZO is much more sensitive than alternative processes the bulb could be fairly low in wattage. I have already printed AZO #2 with a plate burner (NuArc 26-1K) and know for a fact that the UV light gives more contrast. Unfortunately, exposures on AZO are so extremely short with plate burners as to be impractical, but one could use other less powerful sources, say one of the 150 watt mercury vapor yard lights placed 6-8 feet from the printing frame.

    The use of a UV light source in printing AZO would, in principle, allow us to make dual-purpose pyro negatives that would print equally well on a high ES process such as palladium as well as AZO #2.

    Sandy

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by sanking
    I am going to propose something that has not been mentioned before, at least so far as I know. We all are aware of the fact that AZO is *very* sensitive to UV light so why not take advantage of a pyro negatives stain, which functions as a highly actinic filter to UV light, to increase the effective printing contrast of AZO. All we would need to do is substitute the typical R40 floodlight that is used for printing with AZO with a bulb that puts out a lot of UV light. Given the fact that AZO is much more sensitive than alternative processes the bulb could be fairly low in wattage. I have already printed AZO #2 with a plate burner (NuArc 26-1K) and know for a fact that the UV light gives more contrast. Unfortunately, exposures on AZO are so extremely short with plate burners as to be impractical, but one could use other less powerful sources, say one of the 150 watt mercury vapor yard lights placed 6-8 feet from the printing frame.

    The use of a UV light source in printing AZO would, in principle, allow us to make dual-purpose pyro negatives that would print equally well on a high ES process such as palladium as well as AZO #2.

    Sandy
    Sandy, I would agree with your thoughts on this. About a year ago, I did some testing with the F15 T8 Blb lamp on negatives exposed to Azo. These were negatives that were developed in Pyrocat. My results indicated that this is a much more effective way to expose Azo. The times were reduced by approximately 1/2, as I recall, when compared to the 300 watt R 40 lamp. My tests were conducted using one of the aforementioned lamps at a height of 17 inches above the printing frame. I too found that contrast increased when using a purer UV lamp.

    I would think that the 150 watt mercury vapor lamp would still produce printing times too short for effective dodging. My thinking is that the lower wattager lamps would be better for this.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Miller
    Sandy, I would agree with your thoughts on this. About a year ago, I did some testing with the F15 T8 Blb lamp on negatives exposed to Azo. These were negatives that were developed in Pyrocat. My results indicated that this is a much more effective way to expose Azo. The times were reduced by approximately 1/2, as I recall, when compared to the 300 watt R 40 lamp. My tests were conducted using one of the aforementioned lamps at a height of 17 inches above the printing frame. I too found that contrast increased when using a purer UV lamp.

    I would think that the 150 watt mercury vapor lamp would still produce printing times too short for effective dodging. My thinking is that the lower wattager lamps would be better for this.
    Donald,

    You could be right about the 150 watt bulb. As I recall my exposures with the NuArc 26-1k on AZO #2 were on the order of 0.5 units, or less than a second.

    BTW, I repeated my post on the AZO forum so you might want to join any subsequent discussion on this issues there as well.

    Sandy

  7. #17

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    Thanks Sandy I will check into it...

  8. #18

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    To Jorge- You mentioned developing tubes. Is this for rotary processing or manual? Again...Thanks for the input. I will begin experimenting within a few weeks and will post results. - Jim

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ImageMakers
    To Jorge- You mentioned developing tubes. Is this for rotary processing or manual? Again...Thanks for the input. I will begin experimenting within a few weeks and will post results. - Jim
    Very manual, you have to stand there rolling the tubes. I got the ones JandC is selling...try them, they are great and cheap...

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ImageMakers
    . . . developing tubes. Is this for rotary processing or manual? Again...Thanks for the input.

    - Jim
    Just a clarification of terminolgy. Developing in tubes can be done with either stand or semi-stand type of agitation, where one would stand the tubes on end and fill them with developer, or with rotary processing, using a small amount of developr and agitation by rolling the tubes around.

    The term rotary means that agitation is done by rolling the tubes around, and this could be done either manually (as we do with BTZS type tubes,. where we typically roll the tubes around in a water bath) or by the use of a motor base, as with Jobo or as we might do in developing film in print drums.

    Sandy

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