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  1. #11

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    Ilford SFX filters or no

    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard
    I recenlty picked up the last two rolls of Ilford SFX at the camera store and I'd like to go to a ghost town near here and shoot the abandoned and falling down old houses. Do you users of this film still recommend the use of red filters even tho' there will be no sky, just old buildings, in the photos.
    As stated by another member, SFX without a red filter will look a lot like HP5+ or FP4+. The advantage is that the film is in that sense dual purpose and can be loaded in subdued light as it is extended red sensitivity not true infrared. However the downside is that, based admittedly on my one and only experience of using it, then unless the sky is included and even then it has to be a sunny day then a red filter makes little difference to the appearance of the picture i.e. compared to Kodak the white ghostly effect on foliage is hardly noticeable. The other ghostly effect provided by Kodak's lack of anti-halation backing is of course also missing.

    However in the right sunny conditions the effect is clearly infrared like, giving an effect which causes the print viewer to wonder whether it is brilliant sunlight or brilliant moonlight and creates that slightly ghostlike atmosphere which brilliant moonlight does .

  2. #12

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    The first few rolls of SFX that I shot were with a Hoya R72 filter and they had excellent IR effects--black skies, white foliage, etc. I later shot several rolls of flower close-ups using #15, #25 and #29 filters and got no IR effect. That's been my only experience with this film. Your experience may be different.

  3. #13
    Bob F.'s Avatar
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    Get it while you can... now discontinued by Ilford (I know lots of us already know that, but I thought I'd mention it...).

    Bob.

  4. #14

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    Ilford sfx,filters or no

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Shively
    The first few rolls of SFX that I shot were with a Hoya R72 filter and they had excellent IR effects--black skies, white foliage, etc. I later shot several rolls of flower close-ups using #15, #25 and #29 filters and got no IR effect. That's been my only experience with this film. Your experience may be different.
    I had a look at High Milsom's book on Infra red "Infrared Photography A Complete Workshop Guide" which is a UK publication. I find it more comprehensive than Laurie Hayball's book "Advanced Infrared Photography Handbook". However each seems to back up your experience of filters which largely is mine also. The problem with a Hoya 72 is that to get the better infrared effect than with a Number 25 or 29 Red the exposures have to be so long that a tripod is probably necessary.

    If you want to use SFX without a 72 filter and be able to handhold then you have to accept a very limited infrared effect usually only apparent on sunny days and with a lot of sky. Overall Kodak HIE is preferred by both authors for its effect. However in the UK Kodak HIE is a lot more expensive than Ilfor SFX

    Pentaxuser

  5. #15
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    I was looking at the Ilford Data Guide and realized Delta 3200 has also "extended" red sensitivity up to 680nm or so

    Anybody used Delta 3200 with a Red 29 filter?
    Mama took my APX away.....

  6. #16

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    To get the IR look, you need an IR filter. Someone recommended the 89B which should be good. I use a B+W 092. Regular color filters make it look like regular black and white.

    Experiment before going. The chance of sucess with film speed and processing and the correct filter factor and metering are almost nil.

  7. #17

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    While SFX200 doesn't give the drama or otherworldliness of HIE, I quite like its subtle appearance. The images on this page were taken with a 25 red filter:

    http://www.mawddwy.freeserve.co.uk/sfx200.htm

    Also: http://www.photo.net/photodb/photo?photo_id=1082849

  8. #18
    Robert Hall's Avatar
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    Ilford acutally made SFX filters. They were about $12US. I still have a couple laying around somewhere. They are equivalent to an 89b. I finally got some good IR results with an asa of 6, so yes, a tripod was necessary.
    Robert Hall
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    Technology is not a panacea. It alone will not move your art forward. Only through developing your own aesthetic - free from the tools that create it - can you find new dimension to your work.

  9. #19

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    I'm going to hijack my own thread here. There's another question about IR film floating at this moment and someone asked about doing IR film with staining devs. Anyone ever try SFX in a pyro/pyrocat dev? Times & temps?

  10. #20

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    SFX

    I have recently shot a roll of Ilford SFX hoping to get some IR effect but was somewhat disappointed. However, I used only Heliopan 25 and 29 filters. With these filters you get decent tones, especially on weathered wood, as pointed out earlier, but nothing like Kodak's IR film. Basically, my impression is that SFX is a good b&w film with fine grain. I checked the film with Schneider 6x loupe and found finer grain on SFX than on Fortepan 200. My developer was D76.

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