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Thread: TF-4 fix

  1. #11

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    Tabular Fixer

    I've been using fineartsphotosupply Tabular Grain Fixer for all of my negatives;pyro and regular with great results. It goes a long way and gives superb results with pyro negatives. No smell either. You owe it to yourself to give it a try.
    Regards, Peter

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will S
    Am I right that PF doesn't sell this in powder form?
    It's made from Ammonium Thiosulfate, which is readily available as a 60% solution. Becasue of that, most formulas that use it start with 60% solutions.

  3. #13

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    I switched over to TF-4 about 6 months ago an I've definitely tried kicking myself for not using it sooner. I love being able to use a water rinse. And the wash times are much less than with Kodak fixer. As for the smell....you can decrease the odor significantly by only mixing it with distilled water. I got that tip from the people at PF directly and it works. Something about how the TF-4 reacts to an agent in regular tap water that is not in distilled water. Give it a try!

  4. #14

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    Well...I mix TF-4 with 18 megaohm Deionized Water - plenty of ammonia stink remains.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hoskinson

    I am going to try Suzuki's buffered neutral fixer as an alternative to TF-4. See the APUG Chemical Recipes Section.
    I have used the TF-3 formula (Similar to TF-4, see Anchell and Troop's Film Developing Cookbook) for many years, but recently switched to Ryuji's formula referenced by Tom.

    Why? Well, for one thing TF-3 really stinks, literally if not metaphorically. But, more importantly, my work with films like Efke PL 100, which have fairly fragile emulsions, made me realize the importance of not having these emulsions swell any more than necessary in processing, which causes them to become even more fragile. A high pH fixer encourages emulsion swelling. TF-3 works at a pH of around 9, whereas the Suzuzuki formula works at much closer to neutral pH, and little or no odor.

    Sandy

  6. #16
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    I've been using TF-4 and loving it, both for film and paper. I too have been trying to kick myself for not doing it sooner.

    The odor doesn't bother me that much, but I do notice it during a printing session (I have very poor ventilation in my dark space). I'll have to check out the buffered neutral one though - sounds interesting.

  7. #17
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    Everybody,

    thanks for your input and wisdom. I now feel like I have to try TF-4 fixer, especially if using films with prehardened emulsion. I am curious about making the leap to Efke film when I run out of stock, and will then consider the choice of fixer again.
    It appears as if TF-4 is superior when using Pyro, and since I'm about to start testing Pyrocat HD for sheet film, the choice seems logical to me.

    Thanks everyone!

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  8. #18

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    > I also have found that I need to use a post fix soak in a 25 gram/liter
    > Sodium Sulfite solution in order to clear the antihalation die residue from
    > some films.

    Do you need to process the film any differently after this soak? Also, how long do you keep the film in this solution?

    Thanks!

  9. #19
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    > Do you need to process the film any differently after this soak? Also, how long > do you keep the film in this solution?

    It appears as if the sodium sulfite solution is used after the fixer, so it wouldn't affect the actual developing phase.
    I would imagine it would be kept in the solution until the dye has cleared. Since the film has been fixed, I think this can be done under illumination so you can see when it's done. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

    - Thom
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by MSchuler
    > I also have found that I need to use a post fix soak in a 25 gram/liter
    > Sodium Sulfite solution in order to clear the antihalation die residue from
    > some films.

    Do you need to process the film any differently after this soak? Also, how long do you keep the film in this solution?

    Thanks!
    25 grams/liter of sodium sulfite is a very good Fixer Clearing Bath and is also effective in removing residual antihalation die. Fix the the film normally and then soak it in the sodium sulfite solution for about 5 minutes. Just wash the film normally after soaking it in the sodium sulfite solution. Most (if not all) of the antihalation die will come out in the wash step.

    If you like, you can buffer the sodium sulfite solution by adding 5 grams of sodium bisulfite.
    Tom Hoskinson
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    Everything is analog - even digital :D

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