Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,487   Posts: 1,571,308   Online: 746
      
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 43

Thread: TF-4 fix

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    fairfield county, Ct.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,825
    Images
    24

    Beat a dead horse AGAIN

    So it's OK to spend money on a fixer that smells up your darkroom and does not remove the antihaltion dye. Fine-go spend your money where you like. The Tabular Fixer that FineArtsphotosupply sells will fix your negatives; including Tabular in 4 minutes with no smell. I have not seen ANY residual dye left after using this fixer. Works great for Pyro too. I just sent Tom Hoskinson a bag to try out for himself. Maybe he will be kind enough to make a post after using. After several hundred 4x5's,5x7's and numerous roll films I'm not even curious to try the TF-4 even though I have free sample sitting on my shelf from P.F. I also have not seen any scratches on my PL100 and that's with tray development.
    Sometimes someone DOES come up with something better. All the hype in the world wouldn't even tempt me to use TF-4; especially after reading these posts.
    Regards, Peter

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    419
    Images
    11
    Oh, come on, Peters - tell us what you Really think I have been using Kodafix on my Tmax sheet film and it works great but 10 minutes is a long run. I will have to try your Tabular Fixer.

    For paper, I use the F6 formula with 1/2 of the recommended alum. What little odor it has is actually bordering on pleasant.

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by peters
    So it's OK to spend money on a fixer that smells up your darkroom and does not remove the antihaltion dye. Fine-go spend your money where you like. The Tabular Fixer that FineArtsphotosupply sells will fix your negatives; including Tabular in 4 minutes with no smell. I have not seen ANY residual dye left after using this fixer. Works great for Pyro too. I just sent Tom Hoskinson a bag to try out for himself. Maybe he will be kind enough to make a post after using. After several hundred 4x5's,5x7's and numerous roll films I'm not even curious to try the TF-4 even though I have free sample sitting on my shelf from P.F. I also have not seen any scratches on my PL100 and that's with tray development.
    Sometimes someone DOES come up with something better. All the hype in the world wouldn't even tempt me to use TF-4; especially after reading these posts.
    Regards, Peter
    Thanks Peter! I will indeed post my comments after using it.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    fairfield county, Ct.
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,825
    Images
    24

    Superfix

    JDEF- I have no doubt that the superfix will do the job but as I like to do photography and try to keep my mixing to something I can't buy why bother? Besides chemicals are not that cheap so if I get what I need in a bag and mix it up in 5 minutes why not? I do buy my sodium thiosulfate in bulk and mix in a little nabisulfite for my prints. This takes me exactly i minute as I just use a premeasured cup and dump in the tray. It's good to know the formula is available so thanks for the tip-off! As usual APUG is the beat source of information short of personal experience that I know of. It's because of guys like you and Tom and many others that I'm making better prints with less fuss. I'm always interested in what you have to say; I was just hoping to share this so others would find out what I already know.
    Regards, Peter

  5. #25
    jmailand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Belmont Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    151
    Images
    20
    I always thought the benefit of this fixer was the elimination of Hypo Clearing Agent bath for Fiber prints. One less step, one less tray. Am I wrong in belieiving this is true. So far none of my prints have turned yellow.

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,879
    Images
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by jmailand
    I always thought the benefit of this fixer was the elimination of Hypo Clearing Agent bath for Fiber prints. One less step, one less tray. Am I wrong in belieiving this is true. So far none of my prints have turned yellow.
    Different subject. I have been discussing the use of HCA for removal of residual antihalation dye in film - post fixing.
    Tom Hoskinson
    ______________________________

    Everything is analog - even digital :D

  7. #27
    Daniel Lawton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    474
    Images
    26
    Just a question for all you TF-4 users. For the water bath do you using running water or just a tray full of water. Oddly enough I find using a water bath to be more of a hassle than an acid stop. Due to my set up I can't place my trays next to a sink so if I were to use a water bath I would have to carry the print ove to a sink and then back to the fixer. Instead I have just been filling up a tray full of water and replacing it every 5 prints or so. Since an acid stop is not advised with TF-4 I find this to be more trouble than its worth and will probably go back to my standard fix as a result.

  8. #28
    galyons's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    273
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Lawton
    Just a question for all you TF-4 users. For the water bath do you using running water or just a tray full of water. Oddly enough I find using a water bath to be more of a hassle than an acid stop.
    I just use tap water in a tray. I change it after a few (5 to ??) prints. No hassle whatsoever.

    Cheers,
    Geary
    But your flag decal won't get you into Heaven any more. They're already overcrowded from your dirty little war.
    Now Jesus don't like killin' no matter what the reason's for, and your flag decal won't get you into Heaven any more. – John Prine

  9. #29
    Ole
    Ole is offline
    Ole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    9,282
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    31
    Jay,
    it is quite possible to get dry ammonium thiosulfate, at least on this side of the Atlantic. I have a few kilos in my darkroom, but at present I use the sodium thiosulfate/ammonium chloride combination; at least until I run out of one of them. Which isn't going to be soon, as I bought 25kg Na2S2O3 and 2 kg ammoniumchloride last year.

    The water "stop" isn't a stop; all it does is wash off some of the developer. I use a tray of water - unspecified amount, unspecified number of prints for an unspecified time. At the end of a session it is brown with spent developer. But it still washes off (or in some other way "kills") enough of the developer that the fix lasts as long as it needs to. My prints are fully developed, so it matters not at all if they continue to develop in the fixer. Any residual developer will be removed in the final wash.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  10. #30
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    I've been thinking about making up a neutral/alkaline fixer starting from sodium thiosulfate (rice crystals, sold for pool maintenance, seem an inexpensive source), and using a neutral mix of clear household ammonia and acetic acid to provide ammonium ion for rapid fixing effect, and near-neutral pH for odor avoidance -- likely without involving sodium sulfite, since this could/would be used one-shot economically, and mixed immediately before use. Anyone done this or something close?
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin