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  1. #11
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by juan
    I'd suspect the film is not Verichrome Pan, but Verichrome, which is a different film. IIRC, Verichrome Pan didn't come along until the mid-50s so I don't believe it was made in 122.
    The film is, indeed, Verichrome Pan. Since Verichrome Pan came out in the 1950's and 122 sized film was available until 1971 (check the Kodak web site for more information), it's unsurprising that it's Verichrome Pan film.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  2. #12
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Verichrome pan was made in all roll film sizes, from 828 to 122 (and possibly in the even larger 4" and 5" rolls -- I don't recall if those were still available even in the 50s); it was also sold in film packs in (at least) 3x4, 9x12 cm, and 4x5 sizes, possibly 2x3 or other sizes as well (just saw some in 3x4 and 9x12 film packs on sale with a 3x4 Speed on eBay).

    Relative to developing 122, making an apron is likely to be the simplest way (short of standing in the dark and seesawing four or five feet of curly film). One relative easy way to do it would be to obtain some "Coroplast" -- plastic sheet that's made like corrugated cardboard, typically used for making durable, cheap outdoor signs. Cut a strip to the width of the film, about 92 mm, and peel off one smooth surface layer to reveal the corrugation underneath. Carefully cut through the corrugation about 1/8" (3 mm) in from each edge and peel out the corrugated layer, then cut a pair of strips the same width from the corrugation and glue to the edges of the remaining smooth side. For this film, eight exposures of 5 1/2" length (originally six, but it was changed to eight before VP came out), it should be sufficient to make the resulting strip four feet long (which may require splicing two strips; I'm not sure the Coroplast comes in large enough sheets to get this long a strip across the corrugations), and it should be possible to roll this up and fit it into a standard dual-120 stainless tank with a 35 mm reel on top as a space filler (helps keep the film inside the apron).

    Oh, and for developer or fixer capacity calculation, this much film is like 2 rolls of 120...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  3. #13
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Oh, another simple way to make an apron -- get a pair of the crimping pliers used to join length of metal furnace duct, and use those to crimp both edges of a sheet of nylon or polyethylene around 1 mm thick, same width as the film, and four feet long. The mats sold by Tupperware for rolling out pie crusts would be perfect, except they aren't quite long enough (and there's no glue that will work for splicing, though you might be able to hot weld that material).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    One relative easy way to do it would be to obtain some "Coroplast"...
    Donald-

    Thanks very much...this is exactly the type of information I was looking for. I have plenty of containers that will hold film this large, but finding a way to wind it was the thing that I was stuggling with. Coroplast (and I know exactly what you mean by this!) is the perfect solution.

    (By the way, I searched eBay for old Kodak tanks and loading boxes, and I was stunned by the number of these things that are still available. It's a shame that Film for Classics wants $30/roll for this stuff, or I'd be tempted to spend some time shooting this camera as it was meant to be used.)

    Be well.
    Dave
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  5. #15
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongo
    (By the way, I searched eBay for old Kodak tanks and loading boxes, and I was stunned by the number of these things that are still available. It's a shame that Film for Classics wants $30/roll for this stuff, or I'd be tempted to spend some time shooting this camera as it was meant to be used.)
    Something you might consider is making up an adapter to fit into the frame mask and hold a single 9x12 cm sheet (assuming you don't have the sheet film adapter back to begin with -- which can be fed by cutting down 5x7 or 8x10 film to the 3 1/4" x 5 1/2" postcard format). That won't give you the whole frame, but it will let you get large format negatives instead of a 120-based "panoramic" image. Another option might be to put a Polaroid 3x4 pack film back on it somehow (the spool wells would make nice anchor points for an adapter, though film plane preservation could be a big issue); it would certainly have more class than the plastic cameras that are often seen in conjunction with that film.

    Or, since you have two spools, you might just get a roll of aerographic film from that eBay seller, make a slitter, and load your own (at least until the backing from that VP wears out -- even then, you can make backing from two strips of 120 backing paper). One roll of that stuff should keep that camera shooting for several years, given you can only roll one roll at a time unless you make up some more spools (also not out of the question -- brass sheet and tube, a little solder, and some dowel, plus a few tools).
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

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