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  1. #1
    Mongo's Avatar
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    Help developing 122 film

    I just picked up a Kodak Folding Autographic 3A camera on eBay that I intended to convert to a panoramic camera. When I got it, there was a roll of 122 size film inside with frame number 6 showing in the window. I'd like to take a stab at developing it, but I have no idea how to go about this. (The camera, by the way, is probably safe. I got another one for $1 the other day on eBay that isn't in great shape; the one that's in my hands right now is in incredible shape and I hate the thought of doing anything to it that would ruin the look of it.)

    Chemically I'm not worried, it's the physical aspect I need help with. Specifically, does anyone have any ideas on modifying a standard adjustable plastic reel to hold film this large?

    I don't have a true darkroom, so the solution's got to involve a daylight tank.

    (If anyone cares, it's a roll of Verichrome Pan. The paper backing is mostly red, with yellow borders.)

    Thanks in advance for your help.
    Dave
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  2. #2
    msage's Avatar
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    Hi Mongo
    I run across this often. I use D-76 w/anti-fog, process for twice the normal time for VP in a open tray. I realize the open tray may be a problem, but I don't have a better idea.
    Michael

  3. #3
    127
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    I came across the same problem a few months ago (with EXACTLY the same back story - turns out the 3a is pretty modular, so you can remove the bellows lens/assembly and fit it into something else, then put it back into the 3a back later).

    I tried getting it into a tank somehow but failed. I ended up going the "skipping rope" route - open trays, hold each end of the film and let the bottom of the loop fall into the chemicals. Then alternatly raise and lower each hand (like a diablo) to keep the whole film wet. Hard work, and I ended up with a few scratches, but I got some pictures off it! If you try this, then the first 30 seconds are the worst, until the film gets wet an softens - after that its not too bad.

    My darkroom isn't so dark either, but if you wait till it's dark outside you should be OK.

    Ian

  4. #4
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    The "seesaw" method in an open tray or tank would be the usual method. I think it's going to be easier to figure out how to make some space dark enough temporarily to do this than it will be to figure out how to modify a daylight tank for one roll of film.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  5. #5
    colrehogan's Avatar
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    I bought some of this 122 film not long ago from Film for Classics and they also develop it. I know, I can do it myself, but at the time I bought the stuff, I didn't have that capability. I still have them do it.

    I think that Jobo has some sort of reel that holds 4x5 sheet film and this might work for you.
    Last edited by colrehogan; 05-12-2005 at 08:10 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Diane

    Halak 41

  6. #6
    juan's Avatar
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    I'd suspect the film is not Verichrome Pan, but Verichrome, which is a different film. IIRC, Verichrome Pan didn't come along until the mid-50s so I don't believe it was made in 122.

    I'll agree that the only practical way to develop I can think of is the see-saw method. Depending on the developer I used, I might consider something like a Rubbermaid dishpan so that the developer would be deeper. Of course that means using more developer, which may or may not be a problem. Darkening a room is not such a problem - I'm able to develop sheet film in trays in my bathroom at night by making a shade to cover the window.
    juan

  7. #7
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Someone around here has a 122 stainless reel (fits standard stainless tanks, but you'll need a 4x135/dual-120 size with a 35 mm spacer reel) that I gave/sold to them a few months ago (after determining to my satisfaction that there was no way I would be able to fit my 9x12 cm sheet film into it). They are out there, and they're easy to identify because they're about 90 mm between the spirals. Alternately, if you have a dual-120 size Paterson and two reels for it, you could probably use rubber bands and/or gaffer tape to temporarily mount both of the "bottom" halves (the ones that are snug on the tank core) to the core on the correct spacing and feed the film into the improvised reel so created; you wouldn't have the "walking" motion, but the film should slip into the slots pretty readily, and you can measure the film, still rolled up, to get the spacing right.

    The Jobo sheet film spool won't help you at all, though; it'll adjust for 9x12, but that's a few mm too narrow for 122, and in any case it'll only take a maximum of 4" or 5" of film in each slot.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  8. #8
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    Oh, yeah -- if you should happen on one, a 124 reel is the same width as 122; 124 film was 3x4 format, near enough, while 122 is postcard, same width but 5 1/2" frame instead of 4 1/4", and most likely a film reel that fits one will accommodate the other. The 124 film spools are also the same as 122, I think.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  9. #9
    JLMoore3's Avatar
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    You just need to order one of these kits:

    Kodak Film Tank
    John (Alpha Flying Monkey) Moore
    http://www.flyingmonkeystudio.com

  10. #10

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    You can also make a film apron, Kodak made film aprons which is length of plastic a little longer and wider than the format and is curled so the film is supended between the plastic apron when it rolled up. You can find an apron on EBay to use as a model. Using a Paterson type plastic reel with 122 size film is a sure way to crease the film causing those 1/2 moon on the film.

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