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  1. #21

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    Ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate cannot be used interchangeably and the easiest thing is to keep both on hand.

    The cheapest source of sodium ascorbate (in the form of sodium erythorbate) that I have found is from Sutton Bay Trading Company at $6.33 a pound. http://www.suttonsbayspices.com/ Go to the sausage making section.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim appleyard
    Glad to know I can save a $.

    Oh, believe me, I get precipitate and perhaps this isn't the ideal dev mixture in the world; I'm just using up the cal ascorbate.

    I thought of adding it to beer, to make a health drink, but why ruin a perfectly good good bottle of cal ascorbate by adding it to Old Milwaukee Light?
    I was having a senior moment. I hate to think it's happaning. I know I wasn't going off half crocked. I haven't been drunk since my fraternity days. A good many of you were just a twinkle in your father's eye at the time of that party.

    I did figure out why my Ester C tablets wouldn't dissolve in anything but HCl. The one I tried to dissolve in potash solution is still intact. I'm pretty sure the pills were coated with something to keep them from dissolving on the way down to the stomach, where they would come into quite strong HCl. Perhaps my tap water is acidic enough to soften them.

    Anyway, I couldn't find any pure calcium carbonate locally. It all had bioflavenoids and acerola. It still is not a good idea to use calcium ascorbate if you can get ascorbic or erythorbic acid. It is so easy to make sodium or calcium ascorbate from the acid.
    Gadget Gainer

  3. #23
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    Pat, try a stick of chalk from the nearest school house. Even the little stubs that are too small to hold. For that matter, if you're in the Appalachians, as I recall you are, go out in the hills and pick up almost any rock you see, it's probably limestone, which is calcium carbonate.

    Oh. Er, they *do* still use chalk in schools, right?
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Donald Qualls
    Pat, try a stick of chalk from the nearest school house. Even the little stubs that are too small to hold. For that matter, if you're in the Appalachians, as I recall you are, go out in the hills and pick up almost any rock you see, it's probably limestone, which is calcium carbonate.

    Oh. Er, they *do* still use chalk in schools, right?
    Yes, I live in North Central West Virginia in the Allegheny mountians which were formed by water from plains raised up in the formation of the Blue Ridge mountains.

    I don't think that black stuff we have in our back yard is limestone. It burns. The red stuff we have on the other side is red clay, which has a lot of iron. We also have soapstone, which is gray clay. Sometimes, if you dig deep enough, you get a well out of which comes some greenish liquid that also burns. The gas coming out of those holes stinks and also burns. It's pretty darn hard for a farmer to make a living here. Even the cattle have shorter legs on one side from grazing on the sides of mountains. We have clockwise cows and counterclockwise cows. Nothing in the world is more frustrated than a clockwise bull with a herd of counterclockwise cows.

    It's a pretty good chance that the coating of the tablets I tried to dissolve would write on a blackboard. It surely will not dissolve in a carbonate solution. Chalk would, of course, dissolve in HCl. I was wrong about the solubility of calcium ascorbate, but don't bother to try using it in the form of tablets.

    The slate boards that would accept chalk markings are history. They are green boards now.
    Gadget Gainer

  5. #25
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    Well, Pat, I did say *rock*. One might argue that coal is a rock, but I don't consider it such. None of that other stuff you mentioned is rock, but there *is* limestone rock in the West Virginia hills (there must be, they have caves there). If you're not in the area that has caves (and you probably aren't, limestone and coal don't go together AFAIK), then you probably don't have anything I'd think of as rock until you dig down through the coal -- and then it's probably slate, mudstone, or possibly dolomite.

    Even the green boards in schools take marks from stuff marketed as chalk, but as I recall, it's got little actual chalk content these days -- zinc oxide in some friable binder so it makes a nice bright white mark and can be used to mark on "blackboard paint" which, as you say, is often green.

    Oh, never mind.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  6. #26
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    Probably the oldest strata are limestone and sandstone. Diamonds have been found. There are fascinating inclined strata not too far from here. We have some cliffs where wind erosion is evident. Depending on where you are in North Carilina, you can see the same things. Around Mt. Airy, I heard accents that reminded me of younger days in West Virginia. I was born here, but brought up in Webster Groves, MO. My memories of a few days in Seattle were sunshine and rain every day. The rain seemed sort of dry.
    Gadget Gainer

  7. #27
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    If I hadn't moved to NC recently, Pat, I wouldn't understand what you mean by rain being "sort of dry" -- what I was used to calling rain in Seattle wouldn't even begin to pass here. People say Seattle is rainy -- and it is, in terms of number of days of rain in a year -- but Greensboro, NC gets more than half again as much rain as Seattle, measured in inches per year. The difference is that here, it falls at an inch an hour or greater, for a half hour or an hour at a time, and then it's sunny, hot, and humid for a week, where in Seattle it takes four or five days to accumulate an inch in the rain gauges. Well, and the other difference is that the summer is the rainy season here, where Seattle has most of its rain in the winter.

    Where I am, there isn't much limestone (though I see limestone pebbles mixed in when someone drops a load of gravel on a driveway) -- they say this area is the foothills, but after 20+ years in Seattle, I haven't seen anything I'd call a hill since I passed Asheboro while moving here. Certainly nothing here that would keep me at home on a snowy day (but the ice sheets we get are something else -- I have a policy that if I can't stand up on a road, I won't try to drive on it).

    Ah, well -- traded earthquakes and living in sight of a major volcano for multiple hurricane remnants per year and tornado warnings everyone ignores. Maybe I should move to Minnesota -- I know how to handle snow and cold weather after growing up in northern Idaho, and there hasn't been a volcanic eruption in that area in millions of years...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

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