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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles
    thank you for the answers. I wanted to try it with centennial pop...I will see if I can use an electric dish warmer
    Nelson Gold Toner can give warm images and I do not know if that is the toner you want to use with Centennial POP. The image color of POP before toning is pronounced brown and this toner just may add to the alread warm color. If you want to cool the image down you should check the toners at Chicago Albumen works http://www.albumenworks.com/toning.html

    Mike

  2. #12

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    Till now I used the tetenal gold toner, giving first red tones, then blue ones.
    Are you sure Nelson GT is warming even with prolonged immersion of the print in it?
    Thank you
    P.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles
    Till now I used the tetenal gold toner, giving first red tones, then blue ones.
    Are you sure Nelson GT is warming even with prolonged immersion of the print in it?
    Thank you
    P.
    Did you get those colors with Centennial POP?

    I am not an expert in Gold Toning, but my Nelson GT Kit gave me brown tones using Forte WT paper and wicked/sickly brown color when used with POP. It might be because the Nelson Toner is a combination of Gold and Silver Chloride, whereas most POP toners only contain Gold Chloride.

    The Photo Formulary GP Toner definitely cooled my POP images down.

    Would be interested in how your POP images come out

    Mike

  4. #14

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    Yes, Nelson's does give a warm tone, at least with all the enlarging papers I've used. I've never used POP--don't know how that would respond. Actually the longer it's immersed, the warmer the papers I've used have become. It's really a beautiful look, if that's what you're after.

  5. #15

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    yep, with tetenal GT, i get first red, then brown, then a colder tone. To get the colder tone i need something like 5 minutes. I have not tried nelson with pop yet..
    maybe I will try mixing my own gold toner to see if I will get colder images

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Perikles
    I dont know where to find reptile heating pads, and I
    dont want to keep prints in it for 1 h
    Reptile supplies are found at pet supply stores. Not much heat pad
    selection in my area; ditto eBay. But via the WWW ... . Dan

  7. #17

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    checking the dishwarmer now

  8. #18

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    Be careful with placing weight on an electric heating pads, many fires have been accidentally started this way. As in leaving a heavy tray with water on top of a heating pad on 'high' unattended. Just a warning, you know? Although reptile heating pads very well might be made for supporting weight.

    I use a submersible aquarium heater in a rubbermaid filled with water, and then place the tray inside the water-filled rubbermaid.

    A submersible heater and thermostat are nice things to have, I've a Unicolor developer tempering tank which is strikingly similar to the Jobo one.

  9. #19

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    thanks Philip My dishwarmer is old and robust and I place over it no more than a plastic tray with 1 lt of liquid, I guess it's quite safe. But if I can find reptile pads or aquarium heaters I will try them.
    My best regards

  10. #20

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    [QUOTE=Phillip P. Dimor]
    "Be careful with placing weight on an electric heating pads, many
    fires have been accidentally started this way. As in leaving a heavy
    tray with water on top of a heating pad on 'high' unattended. Just
    a warning, you know? Although reptile heating pads very well
    might be made for supporting weight."

    I think with a little caution they'd be safe. A styrofoam under pad is
    is a suggestion I've read. Typical wattage is low. They are good for
    some weight. I'd have no problem as I use as little solution volume
    as is easy to work with.

    Nelson's Gold Toner is actually a hypo-alum toner. I believe the
    minute amount of gold used serves only to catalyze the oxidation of
    the thiosulfate and do that at a lower temperature. Note the lack of
    alum in Nelson's. Nelson's is not really a 'gold' toner. The lower
    temperature used for toning and, perhaps, some interaction
    with the gold gives Nelson's it's special character.

    Oxidation of the hypo causes sulfur to be released. I'd think as
    little depth of solution as is practical should result in faster toning.
    That also applies to hypo-alum toners. That would have to be
    tested but on the face of it; makes sense to me.


    "I use a submersible aquarium heater ..."

    I thought 80 to 85F about their limit. Dan

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