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  1. #11

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    Jan 2005
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    Glass bottles and wash well after each use. The crud from plastic eventually gets on your film and makes a mess. I don`t seem to get the deposits I did with plastic.

  2. #12
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    Feb 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer
    In general, most crud can be cleaned off with a mixture of potassium dichromate and sulfuric acid. This would be about 30% acid and then saturated with the chromate salt. It is not for the faint of heart to use.

    PE

    Isn't pot dichromate and sulfuric acid pretty nasty stuff? Wouldn't it be better to recycle the bottle instead of getting the HAZMAT squad involved?
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  3. #13

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    I have switched from any plastic to glass in the darkroom. To clean the glass I use a device that is used for cleaning wine bottles. It attaches to the fawcett and looks to be an inverted spout. When the bottle or graduate is pushed down on the mechanism it shoots a forceful stream of water into the container and does a great job of cleaning the inside of the bottle etc. It is a cheap out for cleaning and cost about $7

    Gord

  4. #14

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    My favorite heavy duty cleaner is clorinated pipeline cleaner. It's used to clean dairy tanks and apparatus and is available in farm stores. Don't know how it works for photo chemicals, but might be worth a try. For example, does a great job on the stainless steel coffee carafe.

  5. #15
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Loose Gravel
    Isn't pot dichromate and sulfuric acid pretty nasty stuff? Wouldn't it be better to recycle the bottle instead of getting the HAZMAT squad involved?
    You are right, and I think I mentioned that in my post.

    It is nasty stuff as are the other things I mentioned, but a very little goes a long way.

    I just tried to give some alternatives. I happen to think that there are a lot worse chemicals in the photo lab than sulfuric acid and potassium dicrhomate, and that many household chemicals are quite nasty but they have been approved for household use so no hazmat team is needed. (the acid is just battery acid from the auto store) I've been using these and other chemicals for years with no problems.

    Still, it is very important to point out the danger though as you and others did.

    PE

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