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  1. #11
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil

    P.S. The shot Francesco posted was scanned and posted by him for me. It is the first shot in this series of three. I didn't have a scanner and the one I have doesn't work too well, so these shots aren't as good on a monitor as the prints. As always, we owe Francesco a debt or gratitude for his kindness and consideration.
    Kudos redirected to you then Tim! Truly beautiful!


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    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by noseoil
    OK Ryan, I guess the cat's out of the bag. No, I'm not allowed to wear fishnet stockings at work.

    Efke 25 at asa 12 or 6, PMK pyro at 7:00 @ 70f, 15 second agitation cycles. Use a tripod. Shoot stopped down to increase "star effects" from specular highlights. Shoot low and slow. Clear blue skies are best (sorry, UK not always cooperative).

    Couple of examples...

    tim, aka, Quido Fartori, Copious Mucose, THC
    I have seen your prints of chrome on motorscycle, and know how amazing you can make it look. I figured, if anyone has any good suggestions...it would surly be you.

    Sorry Jay, I have no experience shooting bikes, so the best I could do was recommend someone that truly knows what they are doing.

    Goodluck,

    Ryan McIntosh

  3. #13

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    Paul, outside in natural light is the only option open to me. my first project will be photographing some pre 1950s Indian/ Harley engines. My friend has a Harley Heritige Softail he would like me to photograph. I also have the oportunity to photograph some unrestored pre-war Indians that have quite a dull appearance (narrow tonal range). I am sure I read somewhere that a blue filter can be useful when photographing metal, I,m not sure if this will increase the contrast or not. I may also have the chance of photo graphing some military bikes in drab green/khaki any tips welcome. The main problem is that the bikes have to be photographed in a very cluttered yard between 2 high buildings, the sun is only shining into the yard at mid-day. An overcast day is good for the shiney stuff but bad for the dull stuff. Noseoil thanks for the tips, and how come Harleys are taking over the world here in the U.K they seem to be breeding like rabbits, I,m a Ducati man myself.

  4. #14
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bogeyes
    ... and how come Harleys are taking over the world here in the U.K they seem to be breeding like rabbits, I,m a Ducati man myself.
    Where I live those stupid little miniature motorbikes (mini moto?) are the current craze. I'll try to get a photo or two. Grown adults on two foot long bikes. Morons!


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  5. #15
    noseoil's Avatar
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    Bogeyes, if you can pick a clear day (sorry) it will be fine. A reflector or two will help pour on the light, but watch out for the mirrors and reflections. Efke 25 is a great film for specular highlights and metallic surfaces, almost liquid in its effect on metals. It is especially good in low light / low contrast situations as it adds a bit of punch due to the steep, flat curve. Just make sure to kick it up off of the toe's curve or shadows will block up badly.

    As far as slow speeds in lower light; use 1/3 stop for 1-10 seconds and 2/3 stop for 10-100 seconds and you won't have any trouble, cut speed in half for tungsten light. In full sun, use a gray card and ignore the specular reflections or underexposure may result. Let that light burn into the film. I use PMK or Pyrocat in this situation because I think it helps to control the highlights.

    Try the filter routine and let me know if it helps. All of these shots were done without filtration, so I don't know what to recommend, other than Efke 25 and a pyro developer. Good luck on the project and please let us know how things work out.

    Don't know why Harleys are so popular now. Over here there is a huge surge in custom bikes done around Harley type motors. The first image is a 1720cc Harley "clone" motor by S&S. They do drag bikes, another one of my favorits subjects. The third shot is a Harley clone running on nitro-methane and making about 900hp, normally aspirated. They're running the 1/4 mile in six seconds now and aiming for 5 seconds. No way you'd get my butt on that seat for a qucik trip to buy beer.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K
    Where I live those stupid little miniature motorbikes (mini moto?) are the current craze. I'll try to get a photo or two. Grown adults on two foot long bikes. Morons!
    Mini-Motos= Mini-Morons, sounds about right.

  7. #17

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    [QUOTE=bogeyes]Paul, outside in natural light is the only option open to me. my first project will be photographing some pre 1950s Indian/ Harley engines.
    As mentioned by others use a white relector to fill in the shadows a large portion of white cardboard will do, use a stand to get the engine up off the ground so you dont have to crawl on the ground for a eye level shoot. If you are handy and have access to white plastic sheeting you can make a light box and set the engines (outdoors) in it for soft diffuse lighting, if you use 35mm you can shoot several rolls, different films, filters, try a star filter, and bracket your exposures. Use all of the advice given and see what works and what you like.

    Best of Luck

  8. #18

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    The key to photographing highly reflective surfaces is to create a large surface for the chrome to "see". In other words, one does not light the chrome so much as creating an even surface for the chrome to reflect.

    In a studio setting this would probably amount to using relatively large banks. In natural light this would be large reflective panels.

  9. #19
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    I am thinking on a foggy day (no shadows) - all the light is diffused and will look like soft even lighting. The other choice is a white tent. No so hard to make or borrow - Those pop up car ports with white nylon all around will do a nice job - A wide angle lens will let you get closer and will help with DOF.
    My photos are always without all that distracting color ...

  10. #20
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    I've shot chrome on a cloudy day (sorry, no fog here) and in full sun on a clear day. I much prefer a clear blue sky for chrome, but by all means, shoot and see what you get! If you try fog, watch out for the dew point or have a lot of towels handy and maybe a space heater.

    To me, the chrome with a soft light and white reflections isn't as nice as with harsh light and blue sky for a firm, hard edged look. Just my $.02 worth, but try it all and see. Depends on the look you want in the shot. tim

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